Employee eNet Sign In

Webpage Search Results

Can't find what you're looking for?
Try our A-Z Website Guide.
...ty's most prominent historic buildings. The park features several dramatic water features; a splash pad fountain with jets that spray high into the air, a lazy river to cool your feet, and a splashing waterfall. Shade pavilions with tables and chairs provide a relaxing place to watch children playing in the water. With its grassy parade grounds, restroom facility, and monument towe...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
In May of this year, the St. George City Council initiated a "Time of Day" watering ordinance which limits outdoor watering to between the hours of 8 pm and 8 am. This helps to reduce the amount of water evaporation that occurs by watering in the heat of the day. During the summer months, the City provides over 40 million gallons of water per day to its customers.   Currently, over 10 million gallons of water are delivered between 4 am and 6 am each morning. Based on the water distribution system data, it appears that the majority of the residents in St. George are watering their landscapes between the hours of 4 am and 6 am.   “A large demand for water in a short period of time creates a noticeable pressure drop in the water distribution system.  While a drop in pressure affects the entire distribution system, some residents will notice lower than normal pressure,” said Water Services Director, Scott Taylor.      A large drop in pressure will affect the efficiency of a sprinkler system and may result in inadequate sprinkler coverage.  Dry areas of a lawn may be the result of inadequate sprinkler coverage.  If this is the case, lengthening the watering cycle will most likely not resolve the dry spot issues, but will only result in increasing the amount of water running off the irrigated area.   “In an effort to improve water pressure city-wide, we are asking residents to adjust their sprinkler clocks to avoid watering between the hours of 4 am and 6 am,” Taylor added.  The City is also asking residents to spread out their outside watering over a longer period of time.  Spreading out the watering times does not mean to water for a longer period of time, but to allow for some down time in between sprinkler station cycles.     Adjusting sprinkler systems to avoid watering between 4 am and 6 am and spreading out the watering times will increase the sprinkler system efficiency and improve sprinkler coverage in most cases.     Be a part of the FIX, don’t water between 4 and 6 am! St. George Water and Energy Services are commited to using our natural resources in the most effective manner not just for the short term, but for the long term. Ensuring an adequate supply of clean, drinkable water and a reliable source of energy at the most affordable rates are our ...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
The Wastewater Treatment Division operates a wastewater treatment facility that accepts sanitary sewage from St. George, Ivins, Santa Clara, and Washington City. The treatment plant has a design capacity of approximately 17 million gallons per day (mgd), and currently treats an average of 9.5 mgd. The plant utilizes an oxidation ditch / extended aeration process that uses physical and biological processes to treat the sewage. There is a 97 to 98% removal rate of contaminates in the treatment process.    The wastewater treatment plant also has the support of a State certified laboratory that is accredited through a national program called NELAP. The lab performs testing for plant process requirements, required Utah Pollution Discharge Elimination System testing, pretreatment testing, and drinking water testing. 
...irrigation companies. The Irrigation Division manages and/or serves as the water master for several of these irrigation companies. The Irrigation Division delivers secondary irrigation water to several City facilities including parks, cemeteries, golf courses, and sports complexes, as well as other large irrigators such as schools, churches, and agricultural users. There are also various areas of town where secondary irrigation water is provided to residential users. 
Water Aerobics are offered both at the Sand Hollow Aquatic Center as well as the City Pool till August 31st. Please See our Summer Water Aerobics Flyer for a listing of times and classes offered at both facilities this summer and our Fall Water Aerobics Flyer for a listing of times and classes offered at Sand Hol...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...! Classes will teach and certify you in the latest methods in Professional Water Rescue, CPR/AED, and First Aid.  Gain the certification necessary to work as a lifeguard at your community swimming pool. A Swim test is required prior to the Lifeguarding Course, which will take place on the first day of class.  This Swimming pretest includes a 300 yard swim, doing either breaststroke, freestyle, or a combination of both, 2 minutes of treading water with no hands, Swimming 20 yards and dive 7 to 10 feet and retrieve a 10-pound object then return to the starting point with both hands holding the object and keeping the face at or near the surface so they are able to get a breath, then exit the water without using a ladder or steps. Additional Materials that will need ...
...your children before coming to the Rec. Center to work out. We try to have water and crackers on hand, but that is it. Babies with bottles are O.K. Pl...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
EPA WaterSense™ Labeled Toilet Rebate Program   The City of St. George Water Services Department offers rebates to single family residential customer for replacement of older toilets with WaterSense™ labeled toilets. The Water Services Department will provide a rebate for a maximum of two toilets per qualifying home.   To qualify an existing City of St. George residential water utility customer must meet the following:   Replace a toilet installed on or before December 31, 2008 Replacement toilet must be WaterSense™ labeled Maximum of two toilets per single family home Provide a completed applications with supporting documentation   Rebates will be given as a credit on the customer’s utility account. The application can be downloaded from the form listed under the “Resource” section below.   The WaterSense™ program will run from July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2020 or funds are depleted, whichever occurs first.       The State of Utah and Washington County Water Conservancy District offer rebates for various water efficiency upgrades.  More information can be found at the following links:   http://www.wcwcd.org/conservation/programs/   https://utahwatersavers.com/  
Sand Hollow Aquatic Center offers water aerobics Monday-Friday in the Mornings and a Yoga Paddle board Class ...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...bsp; If windy conditions exist, do not light fireworks. Keep a bucket of water available. Handle used and "dud" fireworks with a shovel. Soak fireworks thoroughly in a bucket of water, or douse them with a hose prior to disposal. Keep clear while light...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
St. George Water Services is committed to using our natural resources in the most effective manner not just for the short term, but for the long term. Ensuring an adequate supply of safe drinking water at the most affordable rates is our goal.    The City encourages wise water use both indoor and outdoor. There are many things we can do that are simple and can save a significant amount of water.    • Turn off the water while brushing your teeth. Bathroom faucets flow at a rate of 1.5 gallons a minute. You can save three gallons of water every time you brush your teeth for two minutes. Multiply this by the number of people in your home to see how much water can be saved.    • Take a shorter shower. Shower heads flow at a rate of 2.5 gallons per minute. Shortening your shower by two minutes can save five gallons of water.    • Run the dishwasher only when it's full. Wash only full loads of clothes. If you must do a small load and your machine has a manual water adjustment, adjust the water level lower. Using less water saves on the energy needed to heat hot water as well as saving water.    • Check for and repair leaks. The most common leak that goes unnoticed is the toilet. Leaking toilets can waste up to 100 gallons of water a day. Add a few drops of food coloring to the toilet tank; don't flush the toilet for 15 minutes. If the color is showing up in the bowl, the toilet is leaking.    Outdoor water use accounts for approximately 60% of water delivered to customers during the summer months. Set your irrigation clocks to match the seasons and the amount of water needed for your landscape. Adjust the clocks as necessary. Water deeply and infrequently.    If you are unsure of how much water you should apply to turf landscape, schedule a Free Lawn Water Audit. The audits are available annually from May through September. ...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
The City of St. George Wastewater Collection system was first started around 1932. The division currently inspects, cleans, and maintains over 415 miles of sewer main lines, ranging from 6 inches to 48 inches in diameter. The division also maintains 10 lift stations and over 10,000 sewer manholes.    Several crews in the division work to keep the system operating efficiently. Two cleaning crews are able to clean the entire collection system in 14 months. The Wastewater Collections Division uses an inspection crew and camera equipment to ...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Why don't you allow food or beverages in the theater?
Answer: The Electric Theater is a recently restored historic theater.  We ask that you respect the no food or beverage policy in order to help preserve the restoration.  Bottled water is allowable.
The City of St. George Water Services mission is "to effectively and efficiently manage and optimize the complete water cycle for the City of St. George. This cycle begins with the source of both drinking and irrigation water, treatment of water to meet regulations, distribution and conservation of the water, collection of the wastewater and treatment so the water can be reused and returned to the beginning of the cycle or to the environment."    Our greatest concerns are providing water of high enough quality and quantity to enhance the health, environmen...
...n will feature different games, activities along with plenty of fun in the water.   AGES: 5-7 years old
...fessional artists in the community. This colorful square with its bubbling waterfall provides an inviting sensory experience.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Water, Power, Sewer, Garbage Rates   Summary of Rate Schedules - St. George, Utah, Municipal Power and Light System Effective July 1, 2019. Residential Service This rate schedule applies to all residential electric service used for domestic purposes on the premises of any individual private residence, apartment, or dwelling and measured by a single meter at approximately 110 or 240 volts, 60 cycles. The common areas of residential developments will be considered residential service if the owners of the common area are exclusive users and if the total connected load for the common area does not exceed 30 kW. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $16.65 0-800 kWh, per kWh $0.075053 > 800 kWh, per kWh .08132 Small General ServiceThis schedule is for single or three-phase non-residential service supplied at the Department's available voltage through a single meter for all service required on the Customer's premises with a power requirement that is not greater than 50kW or 10,000 Kwh during any one (1) month of the prior twelve (12) month period. Customers subject to this rate schedule who fail to qualify under the above condition shall be classified as Large General Service regardless of the period of time during which they qualified under this Schedule. Customers otherwise subject to this rate who fail to qualify under the above conditions shall remain on the Large General Service schedule until the next regular review of accounts is completed. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $13.55 Energy Charge:   0-1,500 kWh, per kWh $0.083995 Next 8,500 kWh, per kWh $0.091592 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.106037 Demand Charge:   0-10 kW, per kW $0.00 (See note) Over 10 kW, per kW $9.70 NOTE: If an external commercial and or temporary construction use is not gong to exceed 5 kW in demand, the City will not require a demand meter be placed. This exception is only for services that serve signs, lighting , irrigation timers and miscellaneous outdoor needs and will be approved by Water & Power Engineering Power Factor Adjustment: If the customer power factor is found to be less than 95 percent, the customer will be penalized 1 percent of the overall billing for each 1 percent below the 95 percent power factor. Large General ServiceThis schedule is for single or three-phase non-residential service supplied at the Department's available voltage through a single meter for all service required on the Customer's premises by Customers with a power requirement of greater than 50 kW or 10,000 Kwh during any one (1) month of the prior twelve (12) month period. It is also applicable to any customer who fails to qualify for Small General Service until the next regular review of accounts is completed. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $70.68 Energy Charge:   0-10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.061311 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.046224 Demand Charge:   0-5 kW, per kW $0.00 Over 5 kW, per kW $13.47 Character of service: Alternating current; 60 cycles; single phase 120/240 volts; three-phase 120/208 volts, and other voltages upon permission of the City as specified in service policies and regulations. Power Factor Adjustment: If the customer power factor is found to be less than 95 percent, the customer will be penalized 1 percent of the overall billing for each 1 percent below the 95 percent power factor. Agricultural ServiceThis schedule is for three-phase non-residential service to water pumps that supply water to agricultural projects. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $13.55 Energy Charge:   0-1,500 kWh, per kWh $0.08995 Next 8,500 kWh, per kWh $0.091592 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.106037 Other ServiceTemporary Service: Temporary power will be charge at the Small General Service Rate. Service Outside City Limits: Electric service fees/rates for those connected tot the City Electric System, but living outside the City of St. George incorporated area will be higher than the rates paid by those inside the incorporated area of the City, as determined from time by the City Council. Demand Charge Adjustment: If billing is less than 15 days, the demand charge will be pro-rated. Summary of Rates Schedules - St. George, Utah. Municipal Water System Effective July 1, 2019 Summary of water rates schedules as authorized by ordinance passed by the City Council on June 20, 2019 for service available to customers within the reach of the existing distribution system. General Water Service Rate Monthly Base Charge Meter Size Monthly Charge 5/8 X 3/4" & 3/4" 24.72 1" 52.03 1-1/2" 96.80 2" 186.34 3" 332.15 4" 699.38 6" 1439.90 For the base charges shown above, 5,000 gallons per month may be used by each customer without additional charge. The costs for water used in excess of 5,000 gallons per month are shown below. Consumptive Use Blocks for 3/4" Meters Water Use Per Month Costs Per 1,000 Gallons Used 0-5,000 Included in base charge 5,000-10,000 $1.38 10,000-15,000 $1.50 15,000-20,000 $1.60 20,000-25,000 $1.71 25,000-30,000 $1.82 30,000-35,000 $1.93 35,000-40,000 $2.25 40,000-45,000 $2.80 45,000 and above $3.27 Garbage Rates Effective January 1, 2020, the Garbage rate has been increased by the Washington County Solid Waste District by $0.25 cents.  Your new garbage rate goes from $11.85 to $12.10 on January 1, 2020.   Residential Sewer Rate: $15.50 Residential Storm Drainage Fee: $4.50 Residential Water Conservancy District Surcharge Fee: $1.75 Residential Recycling Fee:...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...ixie State University, Dixie Applied Technology College, Washington County Water Conservancy District, St. George Area Economic Development, Utah League of Cities and Towns, and several other city and county-related boards.  Jon loves singing, playing the piano, organ, and guitar, as well as water and snow skiing, motorcycling, and walking or biking on St. George&rs...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: What phone number - do I call to report a water line break? 
Answer: During business hours (M - F 7:00 am - 3:00 pm) you can call 435-627-4802.    After hours you can call 435-627-4835. This is the City of St. George Dispatch center which is open 24 hours a day 365 days a year. If you get a recording the dispatchers on duty are answering another call, please leave a message. Include the following:    - Your name - Phone number with area code - Address of the water break   The dispatcher will contact the on-call water personnel. Please be aware that that dispatcher may be addressing more than one issue and several callers. Unless there is a question about the break, you will probably not receive a call back.
Question: How do I know if I have a leak? 
Answer: Leaks often go undetected, wasting gallons of water and dollars.    - Turn off all the water inside and outside the home. This includes ice makers and other water using appliances such as clothes washers.    - Watch the water meter - often located near the property line or in the driveway    - If the meter is turning, you have a leak.
Question: What do I do if I have a leak? 
Answer: Finding a leak can be difficult. There are some things to check:    - Is there a place in the lawn or landscape that is particularly wet or soft when the rest of the landscape is dry?    - Do you see any irrigation heads leaking while the system is turned off?    - Check the toilets- one of the most frequently unnoticed leaks. Toilets can lose up to 100 gallons a day. Add a few drops of food coloring to the toilet tank. Don't flush the toilet for 15 to 20 minutes. If the color shows up in the bowl, the toilet is leaking. Generally it is the flapper that needs to be replaced. Some homeowners can replace this part themselves, be sure to purchase a flapper for your specific toilet model. If you are not comfortable making this repair, call a licensed and bonded plumber.    - Check water faucets and outside spigots for drips. Washers may need to be replaced.    - Check under sinks for leaking pipes.    - If you cannot locate the leak, contact a properly licensed and bonded plumber or landscape professional for additional assistance.
Question: Is there water and snacks for volunteers? 
Answer: Yes, the Shade Tree Board grills hot dogs and serves them all the volunteers. There will also be chips and water available. 
...Lin April 11- No smART Saturday due to the Art Festival May 9- Water Lilies with Monet - Featured artist is Claude Monet J...
Question: My water comes out of the faucet cloudy and then clears up, why is that? 
Answer: The small bubbles in the water that make it look cloudy or milky are from the air in the water lines. This sometimes happens when a line is broken and repaired or when a water line is first connected to the system. Some areas of town always receive milky looking water due to the design of the water delivery system that feeds that area. Excess air is constantly trapped in the water lines, saturating the water with air bubbles giving the water a milky appearance. Water quality is unaffected; in fact aeration is sometimes used in water treatment facilities to make the water taste better. Letting the water sit for a few seconds in a glass will allow the water to clear as the bubbles dissipate.
Question: Where does my drinking water come from? 
Answer: Culinary (drinking) water for the City comes from a variety of sources including springs, wells and surface water. There are well fields located in the Gunlock area and Snow Canyon State Park. Spring water comes from the Mountain Springs on Pine Valley Mountain. The surface water is from the Virgin River, stored in Quail Creek and Sand Hollow Reservoirs, treated at the Quail Creek Water Treatment Plant and delivered to communities throughout the county.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: What is the hardness of my water and what number of grains should I set on the water softener?
Answer: Generally, water softeners should be set at 18 grains and adjusted higher if needed. The highest it should be set is 22 grains. Keep in mind the lower the grains the less salt or potassium is needed to soften your water. The salt and/or potassium becomes concentrated in the waste water used to soften water and becomes part of the sewage transmitted to the Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP). This significantly increases the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the waste water and is not something that can be removed in the waste water treatment process.  Because some of the treated effluent is used for irrigation water, the high TDS lowers the water quality as many plants are sensitive to the higher salt levels. By setting your water softener to the lowest grains needed, the quality of reuse water used for irrigation is improved.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
The Water Distribution Division is responsible for providing reliable, clean, and safe drinking water to its customers. The water distribution division operates, maintains, and inspects of over 850 miles of pipeline (ranging from 2-inch to 72-inch in diameter), 22 water storage tanks, 16 booster pump stations, 23 wells, and over 15,000 valves. Approximately 50 million gallons of water are delivered to our customers during ta peak summer day, and nearly 10 billion gallons are delivered on an annual basis.    The culinary water delivered to our customers is comprised of springs, groundwater wells, and surface water supplied by the Quail Creek Water Treatment Plant. 
...ocal point are provided by nature. This historic location was the original water source for the settlers of the valley and offers natural wonders found nowhere else in Utah. Botanists have discovered plants that grow only in this unique microclimate protected by canyon walls from harsh winds and insulated by lush plant life. Water percolating from the surrounding red cliffs creates emergent natural springs which fill the pond and supply the water for the historic Waterwalk down Main Street. The park is easily enjoyed by walking the grave...
...ed the new standard of 10 ppb. According to the State Division of Drinking Water, we can meet this rule by a variety of ways including; blending the higher arsenic sources with low arsenic sources; using higher arsenic sources during high demand times of the year and lower arsenic sources during off peak season to achieve a yearly average concentration. After testing all of our wells for the past few years on a biweekly basis we have developed a blending and averaging plan that will meet the new arsenic standard. This will involve installing a new pipeline to bring water from the Quail Creek Drinking Water Plant to the Gunlock and Snow Canyon Sources. We will also be operating our wells in such a mannor that the yearly average concentration will be under 10 ppb of arsenic. The City of St. George is committed to protecting the public health and to compling with all State and Federal Drinking Water Standards, however, the City has explored the valitidy of this new standard with great concern over possible increased costs. We support the Drinking Water Board in its implimentation of this new rule and have determined that a yearly blending and sample averaging is a sensible and cost effective approach to meeting the new standard. Current research regarding arsenic health effects in relation to concentration suggests that the blending and sample averaging plan poses no health effects to the public.    E.P.A. Arsenic Facts These excerpts have been taken from the E.P.A. Federal Register. For a full version of the article please visit; E.P.A. Federal Register "No human studies of sufficient statistical power or scope have examined whether consumption of arsenic in drinking water at the current MCL results in an increased incidence of cancer or noncancer effects (NRC, 1999, pg. 7)." There have only been a few studies of inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water in the U.S., and most have not considered cancer as an endpoint. People have written EPA asking that the new MCL be set considering that these U.S. studies have not seen increases in cancers at the low levels of arsenic exposure in U.S. drinking water. A large number of adverse noncarcinogenic effects have been reported in humans after exposure to drinking water highly contaminated with inorganic arsenic. The earliest and most prominent changes are in the skin, e.g., hyper pigmentation and keratoses (callus-like growths). Other effects that have been reported include alterations in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematological (e.g., anemia), pulmonary, neurological, immunological and reproductive/developmental function (ATSDR, 1998). The most common symptoms of inorganic arsenic exposure appear on the skin and occur after 5-15 years of exposure equivalent to 700 µg/day for a 70 kg adult, or within 6 months to 3 years at exposures equivalent to 2,800 µg/day for a 70 kg adult (pg. 131 NRC, 1999). They include alterations in pigmentation and the development of keratoses which are localized primarily on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet and the torso. The presence of hyper pigmentation and keratoses on parts of the body not exposed to the sun is characteristic of arsenic exposure (Yeh, 1973, Tseng, 1977). The same alterations have been reported in patients treated with Fowler's solution (1% potassium arsenite; Cuzick et al., 1982), used for asthma, psoriasis, rheumatic fever, leukemia, fever, pain, and as a tonic (WHO 1981 and NRC 1999). Although peripheral neuropathy (numbness, muscle weakness, tremors, ATSDR 1998) may be present after exposure to short-term, high doses of inorganic arsenic (Buchanan, 1962; Tay and Seah, 1975), there are no studies that definitely document this effect after exposure to levels of less than levels (50 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water. There have been a few, scattered reports in the literature that inorganic arsenic can affect reproduction and development in humans (Borzysonyi et al., 1992; Desi et al., 1992; Tabacova et al., 1994). After reviewing the available literature on arsenic and reproductive effects, the National Research Council panel (NRC 1999) wrote that ``nothing conclusive can be stated from these studies.'' Based on the studies mentioned in this section, it is evident that inorganic arsenic contamination of drinking water can cause dermal and internal cancers, affect the GI system, alter cardiovascular function, and increase risk of diabetes, based on studies of people exposed to drinking water well above the current arsenic MCL. EPA's MCL is chosen to be protective of the general population within an acceptable risk range, not at levels at which adverse health effects are routinely seen (see section III.F.7. on risk considerations). In terms of implications for the risk assessment, the panel noted that risk per unit dose estimates from human studies can be biased either way. For the Taiwanese study, the ``* * * biases associated with the use of average doses and with the attribution of all increased risk to arsenic would both lead to an overestimation of risk (US EPA, 1997d, page 31). May 1999 Utah Mortality Study EPA scientists conducted an epidemiological study of 4,058 Mormons exposed to arsenic in drinking water in seven communities in Millard County, Utah (Lewis et al., 1999). The 151 samples from their public and private drinking water sources had arsenic concentrations ranging from 4 to 620 µg/L with seven mean (arithmetic average) community exposure concentrations of 18 to 191 µg/L and all seven community exposure medians (mid-point of arsenic values) 200 µg/L. Observed causes of death in the study group (numbering 2,203) were compared to those expected from the same causes based upon death rates for the general white male and female population of Utah. Several factors suggest that the study population may not be representative of the rest of the United States. The Mormon church, the predominant religion in Utah, prohibits smoking and consumption of alcohol and caffeine. Utah had the lowest statewide smoking rates in the U.S. from 1984 to 1996, ranging from 13 to 17%. Mormon men had about half the cancers related to smoking (mouth, larynx, lung, esophagus, and bladder cancers) as the U.S. male population from 1971 to 1985 (Lyon et al., 1994). The Utah study population was relatively small (4,000 persons) and primarily English, Scottish, and Scandinavian in ethnic background. While the study population males had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer mortality, females had no significant excess risk of cancer mortality at any site. Millard County subjects had higher mortality from kidney cancer, but this was not statistically significant. Both males and females in the study group had less risk of bladder, digestive system and lung cancer mortality than the general Utah population. The Mormon females had lower death rates from breast and female genital cancers than the State rate. These decreased death rates were not statistically significant. Although deaths due to hypertensive heart disease were roughly twice as high as expected in both sexes, increases in death did not relate to increases in dose, calculated as the years of exposure times the median arsenic concentration. The Utah data indicate that heart disease should be considered in the evaluation of potential benefits of U.S. regulation. Vascular effects have also been reported as an effect of arsenic exposure in studies in the U.S. (Engel et al. 1994), Taiwan (Wu et al., 1989) and Chile (Borgono et al., 1977). The overall evidence indicating an association of various vascular diseases with arsenic exposure supports consideration of this endpoint in evaluation of potential noncancer health benefits of arsenic exposure reduction. Study of Bladder and Kidney Cancer in Finland Kurttio et al. (1999) conducted a case-cohort design study of 61 bladder and 49 kidney cancer cases and 275 controls to evaluate the risk of these diseases with respect to arsenic drinking water concentrations. In this study the median exposure was 0.1 µg/L, the maximum reported was 64 µg/L, and 1% of the exposure was greater than 10 µg/L. The authors reported that very low concentrations of arsenic in drinking water were significantly associated with being a case of bladder cancer when exposure occurred 2-9 years prior to diagnosis. Arsenic exposure occurring greater than 10 years prior to diagnosis was not associated with bladder cancer risk. Arsenic was not associated with kidney cancer risk even after consideration of a latency period. The NRC report examined the question of essentiality of arsenic in the human diet. It found no information on essentiality in humans and only data in experimental animals suggesting growth promotion (arsenicals are fed to livestock for this reason). Inorganic arsenic has not been found to be essential for human well-being or involved in any required biochemical pathway. Given this and the fact that arsenic occurs naturally in food, consideration of essentiality is not necessary for public health decisions about water. The NRC report concluded: ``For arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action has not been established, but the several modes of action that are considered plausible (namely, indirect mechanisms of mutagenicity) would lead to a sublinear dose-response curve at some point below the point at which a significant increase in tumors is observed. * * * However, because a specific mode (or modes) of action has not yet been identified, it is prudent not to rule out the possibility of a linear response.'' Given the current outstanding questions about human risk at low levels of exposure, decisions about safe levels are public health policy judgments. Risk Characterization In 1983 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983) defined risk assessment as containing four steps: hazard identification, dose- response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk characterization is the process of estimating the health effects based on evaluating the available research, extrapolating to estimate health effects at exposure levels, and characterizing uncertainties. In risk management, regulatory agencies such as EPA evaluate alternatives and select the regulatory action. Risk management considers ``political, social, economic, and engineering information'' using value judgments to consider ``the acceptability of risk and the reasonableness of the costs of control (NAS, 1983).'' Unlike most chemicals, there is a large data base on the effects of arsenic on humans. Inorganic arsenic is a human poison, and oral or inhalation exposure to the chemical can induce many adverse health conditions in humans. Specifically oral exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water has been reported to cause many different human illnesses, including cancer and noncancer effects, as described in Section III. The NRC panel (1999) reviewed the inorganic arsenic health effects data base. The panel members concluded that the studies from Taiwan provided the current best available data for the risk assessment of inorganic arsenic-induced cancer. (There are corroborating studies from Argentina and Chile.) They obtained more detailed Taiwanese internal cancer data and modeled the data using the multistage Weibull model and a Poisson regression model. Three Poisson data analyses showed a 1% response level of male bladder cancer at approximately 400 µg of inorganic arsenic/L. The 1% level was used as a Point of Departure (POD) for extrapolating to exposure levels outside the range of observed data. For an agent that is either acting by reacting directly with DNA or whose mode of action has not been sufficiently characterized, EPA's public health policy is to assume that dose and response will be proportionate as dose decreases (linearity of the extrapolated dose- response curve). This is a science policy approach to provide a public health conservative assessment of risk. The dose-response relationship is extrapolated by taking a straight line from the POD rather than by attempting to extend the model used for the observed range. This approach was adopted by the NRC report which additionally noted that using this approach for arsenic data provides results with alternative models that are consistent at doses below the observed range whereas extending the alternative models below the observed range gives inconsistent results. Drawing a straight line from the POD to zero gives a risk of 1 to 1.5 per 1,000 at the current MCL of 50 µg/ L. Since some studies show that lung cancer deaths may be 2- to 5-fold higher than bladder cancer deaths, the combined cancer risk could be even greater. The NRC panel also noted that the MCL of 50 µg/L is less than 10-fold lower than the 1% response level for male bladder cancer. Based on its review, the consensus opinion of the NRC panel was that the current MCL of 50 µg/L does not meet the EPA's goal of public-health protection. Their report recommended that EPA lower the MCL as soon as possible. A factor that could modify the degree of individual response to inorganic arsenic is its metabolism. There is ample evidence (NRC, 1999) that the quantitative patterns of inorganic arsenic methylation vary considerably and that the extent of this variation is unknown. It is certainly possible that the metabolic patterns of people affect their response to inorganic arsenic. There are studies underway in humans and experimental animals under the EPA research plan and other sponsorships. Over the next several years these will provide better understanding of the mode(s) of carcinogenic action of arsenic, metabolic processes that are important to its toxicity, human variability in metabolic processes, and the specific contributions of various food and other sources to arsenic exposure in the U.S. These are important issues in projecting risk from the observed data range in the epidemiologic studies to lower environmental exposures experienced from U.S. drinking water. Until further research is completed, questions will remain regarding the dose-response relationship at low environmental levels. The several Taiwan studies have strengths in their long-term observation of exposed persons and coverage of very large populations (>40,000 persons). Additionally, the collection of pathology data was unusually thorough. Moreover, the populations were quite homogeneous in terms of lifestyle. Limitations in exposure information exist that are not unusual in such studies. In ecological epidemiology studies of this kind, the exposure of individuals is difficult to measure because their exposure from water and food is not known. This results in uncertainties in defining a dose-response relationship. The studies in Chile and Argentina are more limited in extent, (e.g., years of coverage, number of persons, or number of arsenic exposure categories analyzed), but provide important findings which corroborate one another and those of the Taiwan studies. These epidemiological studies provide the basis for assessing potential risk from lower concentrations of inorganic arsenic in drinking water, without having to adjust for cross-species toxicity interpretation. Ordinarily, the characteristics of human carcinogens can be explored and experimentally defined in test animals. Dose-response can be measured, and animal studies may identify internal transport, metabolism, elimination, and subcellular events that explain the carcinogenic process. Arsenic presents unique problems for quantitative risk assessment because there is no test animal species in which to study its carcinogenicity. While such studies have been undertaken, it appears that test animals, unlike humans, do not respond to inorganic arsenic exposure by developing cancer. Their metabolism of inorganic arsenic is also quantitatively different than humans. Inorganic arsenic does not react directly with DNA. If it did, it would be expected to cause similar effects across species and to cause response in a proportionate relationship to dose. Moreover, its metabolism, internal disposition, and excretion are different and vary across animal and plant species and humans--in test studies and in nature. Until more is known, EPA will take a traditional, public health conservative approach to considering the potential risks of drinking water containing inorganic arsenic. EPA recognizes that the traditional approach may overestimate risk, as explained in the next section. Most of the 25-States data had reporting limits of less than 2 µg/L. In addition, the database includes multiple samples from the water systems over time and from multiple sources within the systems. The m...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...nta Clara River Trail.  Adjacent to the park is the Washington County Water Conservancy District demonstration garden and community garden. &nbs...
...p;   The backflow program was established to meet State and Federal water quality regulations to prevent contamination of the culinary water system. Backflow occurs when water pressure on the supply side of the meter drops below the pressure after the meter allowing water and contaminates to flow back into the culinary system. This can be possible when a hydrant is used to fight a fire, during a main line break, or other similar situations. Under these conditions with no backflow protection, contaminated water from a sprinkling system, trough, bucket, or other vessel can flow back into your residence and the water system. It is important to install and maintain an approved Backflow Assembly on all outside watering systems. Protect your Backflow Assembly from freezing and have it tested annually. Keep hose bib vacuum breakers on all exterior garden hose connections.    Shared responsibility keeps our drinking water safe.
...      St George Weaving Studio, members of the Mary Meigs Atwater Weavers Guild of             ...
...pool. The leisure pool has a zero depth entry area, interactive children's water toys, a water walk and a water slide.  The lap pool features a diving board, rock climbing wall, lap lanes, and THE WIBIT (Saturday Only). Sand Hollow Aquatic Center also offers Water Aerobics, Paddle-board Yoga, Swim Lessons, and hosts the MASTERS and ...
Question: How do I report an illegal discharge or a spill?
Answer: Please call the St. George Regional Water Reclamation Facility (SGRWRF) at (435) 627-4266. It would be helpful to tell us the discharge or spill location, color, approximate volume and if the discharge is ongoing. An SGRWRF representative will investigate the occurrence or refer you to the proper agency.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...nmental Protection Agency (EPA) through the State of Utah Division of Water Quality approved the St. George City Pretreatment Program. The St. George City Pretreatment Program has been delegated primary responsibility for enforcing against discharges prohibited by 40 CFR 403.5 and applying and enforcing any national Pretreatment Standards established by the United States EPA in accordance with Section 307(b) and (c) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), as amended by the Water Quality Act (WQA), of 1987. The General Pretreatment Regulations set responsibilities for federal, state, local government, industry, and the public to achieve the National Pretreatment Program Objectives. Publicly Owned Treatment Works, (POTW) collect wastewater from homes, commercial buildings, and industrial/ commercial facilities and/or locations. This wastewater leaves these locations through a complex series of underground sewer lines called the sanitary wastewater collection system. The collection system transports wastewater to the POTW in Bloomington called the St. George Regional Water Reclamation Facility, (SGRWRF). Once the wastewater enters the SGRWRF, it is directed through a series of treatment technologies effectively removing harmful organisms and other contaminants. Generally, POTW’s are designed to treat domestic sewage only. The SGRWRF is no exception to this point. However, as with other cities, the SGRWRF also receives wastewater from industrial and commercial sources, (non-domestic). The General Pretreatment Standards and Regulations establish legal responsibilities of Federal, State, Local government, industry and the public to implement applicable Pretreatment Standards. The Pretreatment Standards protect the SGRWRF from pollutants which may pass through or interfere with the SGRWRF treatment processes or which may contaminate the beneficial use of the SGRWRF sewage sludge, (i.e. Biosolids). “Pretreatment” is also defined in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Subsection 403.   Available Fillable Forms Wastewater Discharge Application - Food Service Facility Automotive/Carwash Wastewater Discharge Application Dental Questionnaire Dental New Source Questi...
Question: What is Pollution Prevention?
Answer: Pollution prevention is the reduction and control of pollutants before discharge to the sanitary sewer. SGRWRF developed a Pollution Prevention Program, which focuses on waste reduction and elimination through permit requirements to select commercial businesses, and education and public outreach to all customers. Pollution prevention can eliminate or reduce many costs for commercial and industrial users by avoiding permit fees, chemical costs, and disposal charges while helping SGRWRF to reduce the discharge of pollutants to the wastewater treatment plant and the Virgin River.
Question: Can I discharge wastewater generated from a short-term, limited volume project (ex. underground storage tank removal) to the sanitary sewer?
Answer: SGRWRF created a "Special Discharge" permit program specifically for these types of discharges. Call (435) 627-4266 for permit program information and a permit application.
Question: What type of waste does SGRWRF accept thru its trucked waste program?
Answer: Wastes currently accepted are: Portable toilet; septic tank waste; carpet cleaning wastewater; and treated food truck wastewater.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: What are limits for toxics in wastewater discharge?
Answer: In addition to SGRWRF wastewater discharge limits, some facilities may be subject to federal regulations. The federal regulations can be viewed on the U.S. EPA website by typing “Subchapter N - Effluent Guidelines and Standards” in the Search Box and selecting “Parts 400 – 424” or “Parts 425 – 471”.
Question: Why do I need a permit?
Answer: Permits are required for many reasons, depending on type of business, the volume and characteristics of wastewater discharged and the potential risk or impact to the collection system and wastewater treatment plant, SGRWRF personnel, or the Virgin River. Get information on permit requirements by calling (435) 627-4266.
Question: What should we bring to class?
Answer: Appropriate clothing for all weather conditions including a rain jacket, small backpack, 2 liters of water, and a snack. All emergency supplies, such as an inhaler should also be brought and instructors should be informed. 
...2pm, closed Sunday and Holidays. Our address is:   605 E Waterworks Dr. St. George Ut. 84770 Phone: (435)627-4350   Co...
Question: Where can I obtain Wastewater Discharge Application for a food service establishment?
Answer: A Wastewater Discharge Application can be obtained by contacting the City Business License Department, calling (435) 627-4266, or clicking the link- Wastewater Discharge Application (FSE).
Question: What type of permit do I need?
Answer: Several different permit types regulate industrial wastewater discharges to the sanitary sewer as well as trucked wastes accepted at the SGRWRF wastewater treatment plant in Bloomington. Get more information about SGRWRF's Permit Program by calling (435) 627-4266.
Question: Where can I get a permit application?
Answer: Permit applications for SGRWRF’s wastewater permit programs can be obtained by calling (435) 627-4266.
Question: Which public entities own or operate wastewater collection systems within SGRWRF’s wastewater service area?
Answer: The following public entities own and/or operate wastewater collection systems within SGRWRF's wastewater service area.   City of St. George Washington City City of Ivins Santa Clara City
Question: What are the other charges on my bill?
Answer: KWH Charge - Electricity charge during the billing period. Please see current fee chart.    Energy Tax - 6.0% tax on electricity per state law. Funds are used for general service such as police, fire, protection, streets, recreation, street right of ways, etc.    Drainage - Charge to operate, improve and maintain storm water drainage systems and runoff within St. George City.    WCD Surcharge - This is a Washington County Water conservancy District surcharge to fund pipelines, water treatment, and providing water to the City.    Flood Control - This is a regional flood authority fee for planning and funding regional flood control projects withing St. George, Washington, and Santa Clara cities.    Sales Tax - Sales tax on electricity of 3.65%
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...e APWA document have been modified by the St. George City Public Works and Water and Power Departments to meet the needs and requirements of the City ...
...ion, with three pumpers in reserve.  Each engine holds 750 gallons of water, and has between a 1,500-2,000 gpm pump.  Engines also carry res...
...g to make sure it’s as hot as possible for you.  Coolers of ice-water will be available at St. James Park, appx halfway around the loop.&nb...
...nbsp; Suntran - 435-673-8726  Utilities  - 435-627-4700  Water/Energy Emergencies  - 435-627-4835  Water/Energy Conservation - 435-627-4848  For emergencies please call...
... was rebuilt on the same location (7 miles north of the city on a culinary water line) and was rededicated in May 1995. The maximum output is 600 kilowatts (kW) from an induction motor that is turned by a dual nozzle Pelton Wheel Turbine. The rated flow is 10.5 cubic feet per second (CFS) which is 4712.4 gallons per minute (GPM). This type of turbine requires high pressure to be efficient and the system uses a head box two miles up the line. If there is an interruption in power, the plant is programmed to maintain water flow.
...n will feature different games, activities along with plenty of fun in the water.   Ages: 8-10 years old
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
This 4.4 acre neighborhood park also serves as a retention basin for storm water runoff. The park amenities include restroom facilities, two sand voll...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: What should my child bring to class?
Answer: Swim suit, towel, lunch or lunch money, sunscreen, water bottle.
...he thrill ride features ever changing angles of the 330 foot long exciting water ride. The facility also offers a pool ranging from 3 feet to 12 feet in depth.  There are tube rentals to use in the pool, 2 diving boards, a basketball hoop located at the north side of the pool,  and concessions to purchase.  There is a separate enclosed toddler pool for ages 3 and under.  The St. George Municipal Pool offers lap swimming, water aerobics, and facility reservations. Come and swim with us this Summe...
...es 2.2, 4.9, 6.4, 8.6, 10.9, and one will be at the turnaround for the 5K. Water and Gatorade will be available at each aid station and Gu will be ava...
    No Water Aerobics, Swim Lessons, or Lap Swimming on the 4th of July. Holiday Hours for open swim on the 4th of July will be from 11am - 8pm. Deep Water Aerobics Classes are offered Monday through Friday mornings starting ...
...ul and keep the game interesting.  Eight of the first nine holes have water features, so you’ve got to be accurate.  But the fairways are wide, so there’s usually a safe place to play.  The back nine, however, is a different story.  The narrow fairways and hills make you justify your front nine score.  If you’re not happy with your results, Southgate also has a game improvement center with PGA professionals to help you dial things in! Southgate Golf Course is a golf course with multiple personalities. Laid out as a great walking course, the front nine requires accuracy to successfully negotiate its waterways. Eight out of nine holes on the front nine feature either a lake ...
...ton County Convention/Tourism Marketing Board Chair Washington County Water Conservancy Council Member Southern Utah Manufacturing and Logis...
Learn the importance of water safety, along with the duties and responsibilities of being a certifi...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...most prevalent features on the golf course are the challenging par-3s over water and the peninsula that hosts both the par-5 9th green and the par-4 1...
Question: Where will aid stations be?
Answer: There will be two aid stations on the course located approximately at miles 2.82 and 4.93. There will be water and Gatoraid available at each station. 
...rush and wildland fires.  Each truck holds between 250-400 gallons of water, and the majority of them have Class A foam capability.  The St....
... will be two aid stations available, at approximately miles 2.82 and 4.93. Water and Gatorade, as well as first aid, will be available at these locati...
..."passport" marked off and you earn a hot dog, bag of chips and a bottle of water! Adults---the hot dog snack combo is only $4 per person.  &nbs...
...lace for remembrance.    The garden is designed with water features and art work throughout. Seasonal plantings of ann...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
Question: Who do I call if I notice a leaking fire hydrant?
Answer: The City of St. George Water Department maintains all the fire hydrants in the city.  To report a leaking fire hydrant, please call 435-627-4800.
...ontrol and voltage support as well as being emergency back-up for the Wastewater facility.    If you have any questions pertaining to powe...
... the basic rules of cornhole and each game will be monitored by a referee. Water will be provided. Taking place at Town Square from 10AM-12PM. Regist...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo.  The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator.  There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...bsp;        CMR+ Repeater @ Washington Water Tank (east side of St. George, & Washington):    ...
Question: Does the Fire Department provide paint to the public to paint fire hydrants?
Answer: No.  Please contact the City of St. George Water Department at 435-627-4800 for information on having fire hydrants painted.
Question: What should we bring to class?
Answer: Appropriate clothing for all weather conditions including a rain jacket, small backpack, 2 liters of water, and a snack.  All emergency supplies, such as an inhaler should also be brought and instructors should be informed. 
...ete the Residential Utility Application which covers service for electric, water, sewer, and garbage, in most St. George locations. Please submit a copy of a Driver's License, Passport, or state issued ID with each application.   2. If you have had prior service with the City of St. George, any outstanding balances must be brought current before services can be established at a new location.    3. All requests for electric or water service should allow 3 business days (Monday through Friday) for processing. Please check with the seller or landlord of your property to coordinate disconnect and connect dates.    4. If you are renting your residence, there is a $125.00 deposit required at the time of application for all residential services. For business deposits please call 435-627-4700    5. Electric service in the Bloomington and Bloomington Hills area is provided by Dixie-Escalante Rural Electric Association. Their office is located at 145 W. Brigham Road in Bloomington. We provide water, sewer, and garbage only in these areas. An application is required f...
...epartments of the city to include Police, fire, code enforcement, streets, water, power, and parks. The primary goal of our C.A.T. Teams is to wo...
...windy, dusty, and suffocating hot during the summer. Conditions were grim. Water was scarce and unpalatable. Sickness and death were common, there was...
...divisions in the department. The Technical Services division maintains the water rights owned by the City, provides monthly water quality sampling and testing, and updates and maintains an accurate GIS based map of all of the departments’ assets.    The Technical Services Division also develops and maintains computer models of each of the water, irrigation, and wastewater systems to assist in long term master planning.    The majority of our pump station, lift station, automatic flow valves, and tank levels are controlled and monitored by a computerized Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system. The SCADA system was developed and is maintained by the Technical Services division. The SCADA system provides a more efficient way of controlling and monitoring the water distribution, irrigation, wastewater collections, and wastewater treatment systems. 
... be in awe over the amazing landscapes that surround this course. Bridges, water hazards and elevation drops make every hole an adventure!  There is even a par 3 island hole that will leave you dreaming about a hole in one.   Golf Digest twice rated Sunbrook Golf Course as the best golf course in Utah. This rating is a result of a number of elements including scenery, challenge, quality, and service. With the addition of the Black Rock Nine, Sunbrook is the only golf club in southwest Utah to feature 27 championship holes.   Fairway Magazine talks about Sunbrook Golf Course: The crown jewel of St. George City owned golf courses is the Sunbrook Golf Course.  Sunbrook features three distinct nines. The Pointe nine meanders through the foothills of the west side of St. George, offering tremendous views of the surrounding landscape. The Pointe has plenty of water hazards and some great risk/reward holes.The Wood Bridge nine features two of the most recognizable golf holes in southern Utah. The 4th hole is a par 3 with an elevated tee shot to an island green. The island green is generous in size but it is still no consolation to golfers wishing to avoid dumping that new Titleist into the water. And if an island green isn’t enough, the par-4 5th hole has more in store for you. From the tee the famous wood bridge is visible just beyond the landing area. The hole requires a well-placed tee shot between water hazards and sagebrush, all from an elevated tee. Once you find the la...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
... The Wave. She is an award-winning weaver and a member of The Mary Meigs Atwater Weaver’s Guild of Utah, as are many artists in Twisting Twining Tumbling. The Guild is named after a founding member, Mary Meigs Atwater.  Mary Meigs Atwater is often credited for saving hand weaving in America.  She was a very interesting and adventuresome woman.  She taught weaving in the 30-40’s, ran a nationally distributed bulletin for weavers, "The Shuttlecraft Bulletins," and authored a number of monograms and books on weaving. Mimi continue's Mary Meig Atwater's legacy through her own weaving. Here, Mimi writes about one of...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
...orge Firefighter's Association will be out with SGFD Fire Trucks, spraying water on runners! There will be the option to get wet or to stay dry. Our ...
Question: Does my reservation include use of the power/water?
Answer: Yes, there are outlets in the pavilion.  The outlets are good for warming food and the use of a stereo. The outlets cannot accommodate the use of a bounce house.  A bounce house must have its own generator. There are drinking fountains, but the use of hoses and water from a spigot are not available for the public to use.
... being returned. Here’s what you get:   Kit 1- Elephants and Watercolors Kit 2- Drawing with Pastel Chalk Kit 3- Shapes – Cut and Paste Kit 4- Dots Kit 5- Coloring with Crayons Kit 6- Paul Klee – Bristle Block Sculpture Kit 7- How to Draw People and Dinosaurs Kit 8- Georgia O’Keeffe – Water Color Resist Kit 9- Quilt Patterns Kit 10- Claude Monet - Payons K...
All landscape workshops are hosted by the Washington County Water Conservancy District. To secure your spot, please call 435-673-3617.&...
... In additional to the festival at the Nature Center, the Washington County Water Conservancy District will be hosting their Fall Garden Fair at the Ga...
...ve, Hurricane, UT 84737 Time: 6:30 pm to 8 pm Menu: Taco Bar Buffet with water and lemonade *Beer and soft drinks will be available for purchase C...
Question: What does the ISO look for when determining a city's PPC grade?
Answer: ISO surveyors will inspect the following things within the city: Emergency communications systems; fire department suppression capabilities such as engine companies, ladder or service companies, deployment of fire companies, equipment carried on apparatus, pumping capacity, reserve apparatus, company personnel, and training; water supply systems, including the frequency of hydrant inspections and flow-testing programs; and community risk reduction efforts, such as fire prevention code adoption, public fire safety education, and fire investigation. Additionally, the ISO will look at how far a home is from the nearest fire hydrant and the distance between the home and the nearest fire station. ISO scores all these things and determines a city’s PPC through the use of the ISO Fire Suppression Rating Schedule – the manual for evaluating fire protection.
...Toss Photo Booth Balloons Arcade Basketball Shuffleboard  Sponge Water Wars  Jumbo Human Bubbles  Bean Bag Throw Duck Pond Ring Toss Hit the Can Golf Putt Tic Tac Toe Stand a Bottle Squirt the Ball Indoor Games and Activities are on the 3rd Floor of the Children's Museum - Sponsored by Crumbl Cookies Bingo Giant Jenga Arts and Crafts Giant Connect 4 Cookie Walk Water Games (Water Area at Town Square) 8:00 am to 1:00 pm, hosted by St. George Tennis & Pickleball  Games Sponge Toss - Sponsored by Hurst General Store/Ace Hardware  Beach Ball Race Tennis Water Can Relay Contests (All Contest will take place at the Contest Sta...
Question: What is the PPC grade for the City of St. George?
Answer: The City of St. George is a PPC 3/3X, meaning we’re a PPC 3 overall, but we have several homes that are over 1,000 feet from a creditable water source.  This is a good score! Remember: The lower the number, the better. Out of 327 Utah communities surveyed in 2019, only 36 communities had a PPC of 3 or better. There are some neighborhoods in St. George that are 7 miles or more from a fire station. Those neighborhoods are rated a PPC 10 due to their distance from the nearest fire station.
Question: What is the PPC program?
Answer: PPC is the abbreviation for ISO’s Public Protection Classification program. Through regular evaluations of communities and their fire departments, a city will receive a PPC grade (also sometimes referred to as an ISO score) which determines the cost of fire insurance. PPC grades are on a scale from 1-10, and the lower the number, the better the grade.  Grades may also have a letter behind them (B, W, X, or Y) which adds more detail to the grade. Cities can have a split classification such as “1/1X”, which would mean their overall grade is a 1, but there are several homes in the city that are further than 1,000 feet from a creditable water source. Any area of town that is more than 7 road miles from a fire station is automatically rated a PPC 10.  
...onaquint Nature Center TNC Outdoor Education team presents topics such as water, desert plants & animals, tree identification, birds of prey, Utah’s black bears and more to school groups from Kindergarten to fifth grade tailoring the discussions and hands-on activities to the age of the participants. These classes are presented at Tonaquint Park and Nature Center but can be brought to a classroom at your school. Additionally, home-school groups can coordinate classes with our staff to meet their specific needs.   Outdoor Education Program Topics A variety of topics can be presented by the TNC’s staff and volunteers. Below is a a current list of topics that are offered.   Topics 1.       Animal Biomes (Habitats) 2.       Beak Buffet (Bird Adaptations) 3.       Birds of Prey (Owls, Hawks and More) 4.       Desert Wildlife (live desert reptiles)*presented by Red Cliffs Desert Reserve 5.       Flutter Away (Butterfly Life Cycle) 6.       Garden Creatures (plants and critters of the garden) *presented by the Washington Co. Water Conservancy District 7.       Beak Buffet (Bird Adaptations) 8.       Million Year Old Picnic (Reuse and Recycle) 9.   Gurrr…. Utah’s Black Bear 10.   Wading in Wetlands 11.   Water Cycle 12.   You, Me and Trees 13.   Tennis is for Everyon...
...onaquint Nature Center TNC Outdoor Education team presents topics such as water, desert plants & animals, tree identification, birds of prey, Utah’s black bears and more to school groups from Kindergarten to fifth grade tailoring the discussions and hands-on activities to the age of the participants. These classes are presented at Tonaquint Park and Nature Center but can be brought to a classroom at your school. Additionally, home-school groups can coordinate classes with our staff to meet their specific needs.   Outdoor Education Program Topics A variety of topics can be presented by the TNC’s staff and volunteers. Below is a a current list of topics that are offered.   Topics 1.       Animal Biomes (Habitats) 2.       Beak Buffet (Bird Adaptations) 3.       Birds of Prey (Owls, Hawks and More) 4.       Desert Wildlife (live desert reptiles)*presented by Red Cliffs Desert Reserve 5.       Flutter Away (Butterfly Life Cycle) 6.       Garden Creatures (plants and critters of the garden) *presented by the Washington Co. Water Conservancy District 7.       Beak Buffet (Bird Adaptations) 8.       Million Year Old Picnic (Reuse and Recycle) 9.   Gurrr…. Utah’s Black Bear 10.   Wading in Wetlands 11.   Water Cycle 12.   You, Me and Trees   13.   Tennis is for...
...y miles 4, 7.6, 9, 10.7, 12, and one will be at the turnaround for the 5K. Water and Gatorade will be available at each aid station and Gu will be ava...
...teaches candidates to introduce and develop fitness activities, skills and water safety and swimming skills in several Red Cross programs. Participant...
...the City of St George will be switching software to ComplianceGO for Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) compliance management.      As a builder you are required to complete weekly stormwater inspections on your construction site(s)...and ComplianceGO has made ...