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City of St. George RTK Base Station Base Name: SGU1   National Geodetic Survey – CORS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-cors/corsage.prl?site=SGU1 NAD83 2011 Epoch 2010.0 Position (derived fr...
  101 ON PROP 1   For those less familiar, Prop 1 is a quarter-cent sales tax, that's one penny for every four dollars spent. Prop 1 will NOT apply to medical bills, utiliti...
Interested in being a Sponsor for the Independence Day Celebration? There are a variety of different opportunities for doing so! The Independence Day Celebration is one of the most visited events...
...:30pm Mountain Time.   ST GEORGE CITY OUTSTANDING BALLOT COUNT INFORMATION (as of Wed, Aug 14, 2019 at 4:01 PM)   BY MAIL: 1558 PROVISIONAL: 2 PROBLEMS / UNSIGNED / LETTER SENT: 229 POTENTIAL BALLOTS: 1789 LATE POSTMARK: 32   PUBLIC NOTICE ST. GEORGE CITY MUNICIPAL ELECTION MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL POSITIONS TO BE FILLED Please be advised that the City of St. George, Utah will hold a municipal election this year. The general election will be held November 5, 2019. A primary election, if needed, will be held August 13, 2019. The offices which will be up for election are as follows: Three (3) City Council positions - Four (4) Year Term   Qualifications to be a candidate are: - Be a registered voter of the City of St. George - Be a resident of the City of St. George, or a territory which was annexed into the City of St. George, for twelve (12) consecutive months immediately preceding the date of the election - Maintain residency within the City of St. George during term of office - Not be convicted of a felony - Pay the $50 filing fee for City Council   Candidates must file their declaration of candidacy in person with the City Recorder at the City Office, 175 East 200 North, St. George, Utah during regular office hours (Monday – Friday, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm) from June 1 through June 7, 2019. For additional information, please go to www.vote.utah.gov or contact Christina Ferna...
...ned the question of essentiality of arsenic in the human diet. It found no information on essentiality in humans and only data in experimental animals suggesting growth promotion (arsenicals are fed to livestock for this reason). Inorganic arsenic has not been found to be essential for human well-being or involved in any required biochemical pathway. Given this and the fact that arsenic occurs naturally in food, consideration of essentiality is not necessary for public health decisions about water. The NRC report concluded: ``For arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action has not been established, but the several modes of action that are considered plausible (namely, indirect mechanisms of mutagenicity) would lead to a sublinear dose-response curve at some point below the point at which a significant increase in tumors is observed. * * * However, because a specific mode (or modes) of action has not yet been identified, it is prudent not to rule out the possibility of a linear response.'' Given the current outstanding questions about human risk at low levels of exposure, decisions about safe levels are public health policy judgments. Risk Characterization In 1983 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983) defined risk assessment as containing four steps: hazard identification, dose- response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk characterization is the process of estimating the health effects based on evaluating the available research, extrapolating to estimate health effects at exposure levels, and characterizing uncertainties. In risk management, regulatory agencies such as EPA evaluate alternatives and select the regulatory action. Risk management considers ``political, social, economic, and engineering information'' using value judgments to consider ``the acceptability of risk and the reasonableness of the costs of control (NAS, 1983).'' Unlike most chemicals, there is a large data base on the effects of arsenic on humans. Inorganic arsenic is a human poison, and oral or inhalation exposure to the chemical can induce many adverse health conditions in humans. Specifically oral exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water has been reported to cause many different human illnesses, including cancer and noncancer effects, as described in Section III. The NRC panel (1999) reviewed the inorganic arsenic health effects data base. The panel members concluded that the studies from Taiwan provided the current best available data for the risk assessment of inorganic arsenic-induced cancer. (There are corroborating studies from Argentina and Chile.) They obtained more detailed Taiwanese internal cancer data and modeled the data using the multistage Weibull model and a Poisson regression model. Three Poisson data analyses showed a 1% response level of male bladder cancer at approximately 400 µg of inorganic arsenic/L. The 1% level was used as a Point of Departure (POD) for extrapolating to exposure levels outside the range of observed data. For an agent that is either acting by reacting directly with DNA or whose mode of action has not been sufficiently characterized, EPA's public health policy is to assume that dose and response will be proportionate as dose decreases (linearity of the extrapolated dose- response curve). This is a science policy approach to provide a public health conservative assessment of risk. The dose-response relationship is extrapolated by taking a straight line from the POD rather than by attempting to extend the model used for the observed range. This approach was adopted by the NRC report which additionally noted that using this approach for arsenic data provides results with alternative models that are consistent at doses below the observed range whereas extending the alternative models below the observed range gives inconsistent results. Drawing a straight line from the POD to zero gives a risk of 1 to 1.5 per 1,000 at the current MCL of 50 µg/ L. Since some studies show that lung cancer deaths may be 2- to 5-fold higher than bladder cancer deaths, the combined cancer risk could be even greater. The NRC panel also noted that the MCL of 50 µg/L is less than 10-fold lower than the 1% response level for male bladder cancer. Based on its review, the consensus opinion of the NRC panel was that the current MCL of 50 µg/L does not meet the EPA's goal of public-health protection. Their report recommended that EPA lower the MCL as soon as possible. A factor that could modify the degree of individual response to inorganic arsenic is its metabolism. There is ample evidence (NRC, 1999) that the quantitative patterns of inorganic arsenic methylation vary considerably and that the extent of this variation is unknown. It is certainly possible that the metabolic patterns of people affect their response to inorganic arsenic. There are studies underway in humans and experimental animals under the EPA research plan and other sponsorships. Over the next several years these will provide better understanding of the mode(s) of carcinogenic action of arsenic, metabolic processes that are important to its toxicity, human variability in metabolic processes, and the specific contributions of various food and other sources to arsenic exposure in the U.S. These are important issues in projecting risk from the observed data range in the epidemiologic studies to lower environmental exposures experienced from U.S. drinking water. Until further research is completed, questions will remain regarding the dose-response relationship at low environmental levels. The several Taiwan studies have strengths in their long-term observation of exposed persons and coverage of very large populations (>40,000 persons). Additionally, the collection of pathology data was unusually thorough. Moreover, the populations were quite homogeneous in terms of lifestyle. Limitations in exposure information exist that are not unusual in such studies. In ecological epide...
...d the requirements customers have to meet to participate.  This is an informational document.   Net Metering Application – this is the document that must be filled out and submitted to the Energy Services Department to start the process. This document contains some technical information requests.  The customer or a third party may complete this document.   Net Metering Agreement – this document is an agreement with the customer and the city regarding the responsibilities of each party with regard to the solar PV system operation.  This document requires a customer’s notarized signature.   Net Metering Appendix – this document details the fees related to the program and the calculation of the monthly solar reliability charge and the annual buy back of any excess energy the customer generated.  This is an informational document.      Common questions related to the Net Metering Program   If you are considering installing solar PV on your home or business, there are several questions to ask in order to make an informed decision.    What is roof top solar?   Roof top solar typically refers to solar Photovoltaic (PV) system installed on a roof which generates energy from the sun to power a person’s home or business.   What terms do I need to understand about solar PV systems?   Behind the customer meter: The system is located so that any generated electricity flows first the customer, if the customer needs more energy than the solar PV is generating, St. George delivers the energy to you from the electrical grid.  For example, if your home uses 100 kWh a day and your system produces 80 kWh per day, you will receive 20 kWh a day from the electrical grid.   kW: Kilowatt – is equal to 1,000 watts.  A solar PV system capacity is measured in kW.  For example a 3 kW system would have the ability to produce 3 kW of demand (which is the maximum of energy output at a moment in time).    kWh – kilowatt hour – is a measurement of energy, it is a kW multiplied by the time in hours.  For instance 2 kW for 1 hour is 2 kWh. Customers are billed based on how many kWh consumed in a billing cycle.   For example if you have a 3 kW system (shown above) and it generated 3 kW for 1 hour, it would produce 3 kWh of energy. It is estimated that a 3 kW system in St. George has the potential of generating 5,193 kWh in a 12 month period. The energy produced would go first to your home and then if any more energy is needed, St. George would deliver energy to you from the electrical grid.   How much will a solar PV system cost?  Solar PV system costs can vary depending on many factors such as the size or capacity of the system.  Some questions to ask may be:   How large of a system do I need?   This question addresses what is termed “name plate capacity” of a solar PV system and is expressed in kilowatts (kW).  The capacity of the system will tell you how much energy the system will generate.  For example a 3 kW system is expected to generate 5,193 kWh in a year.   PV Watts Calculator is a website that can provide an estimate of how many kWh’s you will save based on the system size.  The website is http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/    How can I find my utility information?   Contact the St. George City at 435-627-4095 to request a copy of your energy use history.   Will the system be installed on the roof of my home, roof of an unattached garage or on the ground?   That is a question for your installer to answer.  You should check with the City Building Department to determine the requirements.  435-627-4000   Will the system include a battery bank to provide back-up power in the event of a utility power disruption?   That is a question for your installer to answer.      What are the fees and when do I have to pay them?   The fees and how they are calculated are listed in the Net Metering Appendix which found in the Resources section of the Net Metering page on the City’s website.  www.sgcity.org   Can I install a solar PV system on my house?   Yes a homeowner or business owner can install their own solar PV system.  However, a licensed electrician will be required to handle the interconnection with the utility.  An individual installing their own system will need to follow the net metering program requirements.   How do I find a solar contractor?   St. George requires all solar contractors to have a City business license and to have completed the pre-qualified solar contractor class.  For a list of contractors that have met this requirement please contact 435-627-4095   It is recommended that you obtain more than one bid as part of the decision making process.   Once I’ve decided on a contractor or am ready to install the system myself, what is the next step?   Complete the Net Metering Application which can be downloaded from the city website.  https://www.sgcity.org/utilities/energydepartment/netmeteringinformation   Provide all supporting documentation.  A list of ...
Baylor University - Waco, Texas                                                &...
...ed.  Please contact Washington County Solid Waste at 435-673-2813 for information on disposing of trash and construction debris.   Control...
What is the purpose of Backflow Prevention and why is it required?    The backflow program was established to meet State and Federal water quality regulations to prevent contamination of t...
...y. If you have additional questions about fireworks use or would like information on obtaining a pyrotechnics display permit, please contact the ...
Question: How can I confirm/check my race entry?
Answer: You should have received an email confirming your race entry. If you did not or if you can not find the email, you can confirm your entry yourself by going to https://secure.getmeregistered.com/confirm.php#top and searching your name. If you don't see your name, you either searched the wrong name or aren't registered. The search bar will search exactly what is typed, so if you did misspell something (either in the search or during registration) it will not show up. 
Cemetery AccessBoth the City Cemetery and Tonaquint Cemetery are open during daylight hours. At Tonaquint Cemetery, the Dixie Drive entry gate will be locked each day at dark; the gate located at the ...
...er down this page, you will find the Vendor Packet that contains more information about the booths as well as a checklist of things that must be ...
In 2014, the Utah Humanities Book Festival recognized the St. George Book Festival as its SISTER festival. Making the St. George Book Festival #1 in Southern Utah for literary, author and book expo events. The book festival has also become Southern Utah's signature literary event.Utah Humanities, Southern Utah Literacy Council and Heritage Writers Guild's (a chapter of the League of Utah Writers) have partnered together to bring this annual festival to the St. George community and surrounding areas, allowing us to ...
The St. George 911 Communications Center is the dispatch center for every police, fire and ambulance agency in the county as well as being the 911 center for the public. Thousands of 911 calls ar...
The fire department holds regular cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and Automated External Defibrillators (AED) certification courses for city employees and the public.  Hundreds of people ...
  Dates: Wednesday, March 25th thru Saturday, March 28th Ball: TBA   Events: *Please be aware age and skill events may be combined if not enough players *Match times will be ann...
Question: How can I register? Can I register the day of?
Answer: You can register before Wednesday, Nov. 15 at 5:00 pm MST online at: https://secure.getmeregistered.com/get_information.php?event_id=125183.  You can register in person on Friday, Nov. 17 from 4-8 pm MST at the St. George City Commons Building located at 220 N. 200 E.  You can register in person the day of the event, Saturday, Nov. 18 starting at 8:15 am MST at Seegmiller Farm located at 2592 S. 3000 E.