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...13.55 Energy Charge:   0-1,500 kWh, per kWh $0.083995 Next 8,500 kWh, per kWh $0.091592 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.106037 Demand Charge:   0-10 kW, per kW $0.00 (See note) Over 10 kW, per kW $9.70 NOTE: If an external commercial and or temporary construction use is not gong to exceed 5 kW in demand, the City will not require a demand meter be placed. This exception is only for services that serve signs, lighting , irrigation timers and miscellaneous outdoor needs and will be approved by Water & Power Engineering Power Factor Adjustment: If the customer power factor is found to be less than 95 percent, the customer will be penalized 1 percent of the overall billing for each 1 percent below the 95 percent power factor. Large General ServiceThis schedule is for single or three-phase non-residential service supplied at the Department's available voltage through a single meter for all service required on the Customer's premises by Customers with a power requirement of greater than 50 kW or 10,000 Kwh during any one (1) month of the prior twelve (12) month period. It is also applicable to any customer who fails to qualify for Small General Service until the next regular review of accounts is completed. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $70.68 Energy Charge:   0-10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.061311 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.046224 Demand Charge:   0-5 kW, per kW $0.00 Over 5 kW, per kW $13.47 Character of service: Alternating current; 60 cycles; single phase 120/240 volts; three-phase 120/208 volts, and other voltages upon permission of the City as specified in service policies and regulations. Power Factor Adjustment: If the customer power factor is found to be less than 95 percent, the customer will be penalized 1 percent of the overall billing for each 1 percent below the 95 percent power factor. Agricultural ServiceThis schedule is for three-phase non-residential service to water pumps that supply water to agricultural projects. Rates Per Meter Per Month Customer Charge $13.55 Energy Charge:   0-1,500 kWh, per kWh $0.08995 Next 8,500 kWh, per kWh $0.091592 Over 10,000 kWh, per kWh $0.106037 Other ServiceTemporary Service: Temporary power will be charge at the Small General Service Rate. Service Outside City Limits: Electric service fees/rates for those connected tot the City Electric System, but living outside the City of St. George incorporated area will be higher than the rates paid by those inside the incorporated area of the City, as determined from time by the City Council. Demand Charge Adjustment: If billing is less than 15 days, the demand charge will be pro-rated. Summary of Rates Schedules - St. George, Utah. Municipal Water System Effective July 1, 2016 Summary of water rates schedules as authorized by ordinance passed by the City Council on July 18, 2016 for service available to customers within the reach of the existing distribution system. General Water Service Rate Monthly Base Charge Meter Size Monthly Charge 5/8 X 3/4" & 3/4" 24.72 1" 52.03 1-1/2" 96.80 2" 186.34 3" 332.15 4" 699.38 6" 1439.90 For the base charges shown above, 5,000 gal...
Resident Fees To be charged residence fees, the Sexton's office must be provided with proof of City of St. George, Utah, residency. This proof shall be in the form of a driver's license or voter regi...
Special Event Applications can be submitted via email to events@sgcity.org or faxed to 435-627-4430. Please review the Special Event Application and Process Packet for questions regarding your event, ...
Question:  Where do I find the current City code?                   
Answer:  The current City code can be found here.
...he building as part of the St. George's historic district was realized in 1997 when it became the beautiful new home of the Art Museum. The St. Georg...
...p;Jon has worked in several positions with Intermountain Healthcare since 1990 – and since 1995 here in St. George. One of the highlights of Jon’s career has be...
...an reach them Monday through Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. at (435) 627-4399. If you are calling outside of regular business hours, please leave your name and number and someone will return your call during the next business day.    Instructions for filling out a Request for a Protective Order / Child Protective Order/ Stalking Injunction online.  Go to www.utcourts.gov Click on OCAP-ONLINE COURT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM Set up a user name and a password (a new account). Remember to write it down. Look for the type of protective order you are seeking. Example: Protective order-Adult , Civil Stalking Injunction, Child Protective Order, etc. (click on the order that you are seeking.) Fill it out completely. Print it. Take it to 5th District Court and sign it in front of a clerk in the Clerk’s office. Return to 5th District Court when you are called and pick up your temporary order if it has been approved. If you have any questions or problems, please do not hesitate to call us. Victim ServicesSt. George Police Dept. 435-627-4399  
Question: I made a police report with the St. George Police Department. How do I find out what happens now?
Answer: You may obtain a copy of your police report at the St. George Police Department, 265 North 200 East, St. George, UT. Bring your incident number and photo ID, Monday through Friday, 8:00 � 5:00 PM. Information about the process that occurs after the report is made may be obtained by calling Victim Services at 627-4399 during the same hours.
...dside maintains 181 miles of storm drain throughout the city along with 9,299 catch basins, and drainage structures. They install approximately 1,500 ...
Question: Are There Any Car Rental Agencies at the Airport?
Answer: Avis: 435-627-2002 Budget: 435-673-6825 Enterprise: 435-673-5647 Hertz: 435-652-9941   
Question: What is the function of the Victim-Advocate? 
Answer: The Victim Services Division of the Police Department has been extremely active assisting the victims of domestic violence and other criminal related charges. They are the victim's advocate through the court process helping the victims to have a voice, informing them of their rights, especially the right to assist in how the defendant will be sentenced. If you are a victim of a crime in the city of St. George or have any questions regarding the Victim Services unit, you can reach them Monday through Friday, 8:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. at (435) 627-4399. If you are calling outside of regular business hours, please leave your name and number and someone will return your call during the next business day. You may also email: victim.services@sgcity.org. 
...p;Bicycle Patrol The bicycle patrol unit was formed in the summer of 1997 with the purpose in mind of addressing all "quality of life" issues thr...
...CL results in an increased incidence of cancer or noncancer effects (NRC, 1999, pg. 7)." There have only been a few studies of inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water in the U.S., and most have not considered cancer as an endpoint. People have written EPA asking that the new MCL be set considering that these U.S. studies have not seen increases in cancers at the low levels of arsenic exposure in U.S. drinking water. A large number of adverse noncarcinogenic effects have been reported in humans after exposure to drinking water highly contaminated with inorganic arsenic. The earliest and most prominent changes are in the skin, e.g., hyper pigmentation and keratoses (callus-like growths). Other effects that have been reported include alterations in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematological (e.g., anemia), pulmonary, neurological, immunological and reproductive/developmental function (ATSDR, 1998). The most common symptoms of inorganic arsenic exposure appear on the skin and occur after 5-15 years of exposure equivalent to 700 µg/day for a 70 kg adult, or within 6 months to 3 years at exposures equivalent to 2,800 µg/day for a 70 kg adult (pg. 131 NRC, 1999). They include alterations in pigmentation and the development of keratoses which are localized primarily on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet and the torso. The presence of hyper pigmentation and keratoses on parts of the body not exposed to the sun is characteristic of arsenic exposure (Yeh, 1973, Tseng, 1977). The same alterations have been reported in patients treated with Fowler's solution (1% potassium arsenite; Cuzick et al., 1982), used for asthma, psoriasis, rheumatic fever, leukemia, fever, pain, and as a tonic (WHO 1981 and NRC 1999). Although peripheral neuropathy (numbness, muscle weakness, tremors, ATSDR 1998) may be present after exposure to short-term, high doses of inorganic arsenic (Buchanan, 1962; Tay and Seah, 1975), there are no studies that definitely document this effect after exposure to levels of less than levels (50 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water. There have been a few, scattered reports in the literature that inorganic arsenic can affect reproduction and development in humans (Borzysonyi et al., 1992; Desi et al., 1992; Tabacova et al., 1994). After reviewing the available literature on arsenic and reproductive effects, the National Research Council panel (NRC 1999) wrote that ``nothing conclusive can be stated from these studies.'' Based on the studies mentioned in this section, it is evident that inorganic arsenic contamination of drinking water can cause dermal and internal cancers, affect the GI system, alter cardiovascular function, and increase risk of diabetes, based on studies of people exposed to drinking water well above the current arsenic MCL. EPA's MCL is chosen to be protective of the general population within an acceptable risk range, not at levels at which adverse health effects are routinely seen (see section III.F.7. on risk considerations). In terms of implications for the risk assessment, the panel noted that risk per unit dose estimates from human studies can be biased either way. For the Taiwanese study, the ``* * * biases associated with the use of average doses and with the attribution of all increased risk to arsenic would both lead to an overestimation of risk (US EPA, 1997d, page 31). May 1999 Utah Mortality Study EPA scientists conducted an epidemiological study of 4,058 Mormons exposed to arsenic in drinking water in seven communities in Millard County, Utah (Lewis et al., 1999). The 151 samples from their public and private drinking water sources had arsenic concentrations ranging from 4 to 620 µg/L with seven mean (arithmetic average) community exposure concentrations of 18 to 191 µg/L and all seven community exposure medians (mid-point of arsenic values) 200 µg/L. Observed causes of death in the study group (numbering 2,203) were compared to those expected from the same causes based upon death rates for the general white male and female population of Utah. Several factors suggest that the study population may not be representative of the rest of the United States. The Mormon church, the predominant religion in Utah, prohibits smoking and consumption of alcohol and caffeine. Utah had the lowest statewide smoking rates in the U.S. from 1984 to 1996, ranging from 13 to 17%. Mormon men had about half the cancers related to smoking (mouth, larynx, lung, esophagus, and bladder cancers) as the U.S. male population from 1971 to 1985 (Lyon et al., 1994). The Utah study population was relatively small (4,000 persons) and primarily English, Scottish, and Scandinavian in ethnic background. While the study population males had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer mortality, females had no significant excess risk of cancer mortality at any site. Millard County subjects had higher mortality from kidney cancer, but this was not statistically significant. Both males and females in the study group had less risk of bladder, digestive system and lung cancer mortality than the general Utah population. The Mormon females had lower death rates from breast and female genital cancers than the State rate. These decreased death rates were not statistically significant. Although deaths due to hypertensive heart disease were roughly twice as high as expected in both sexes, increases in death did not relate to increases in dose, calculated as the years of exposure times the median arsenic concentration. The Utah data indicate that heart disease should be considered in the evaluation of potential benefits of U.S. regulation. Vascular effects have also been reported as an effect of arsenic exposure in studies in the U.S. (Engel et al. 1994), Taiwan (Wu et al., 1989) and Chile (Borgono et al., 1977). The overall evidence indicating an association of various vascular diseases with arsenic exposure supports consideration of this endpoint in evaluation of potential noncancer health benefits of arsenic exposure reduction. Study of Bladder and Kidney Cancer in Finland Kurttio et al. (1999) conducted a case-cohort design study of 61 bladder and 49 kidney cancer cases and 275 controls to evaluate the risk of these diseases with respect to arsenic drinking water concentrations. In this study the median exposure was 0.1 µg/L, the maximum reported was 64 µg/L, and 1% of the exposure was greater than 10 µg/L. The authors reported that very low concentrations of arsenic in drinking water were significantly associated with being a case of bladder cancer when exposure occurred 2-9 years prior to diagnosis. Arsenic exposure occurring greater than 10 years prior to diagnosis was not associated with bladder cancer risk. Arsenic was not associated with kidney cancer risk even after consideration of a latency period. The NRC report examined the question of essentiality of arsenic in the human diet. It found no information on essentiality in humans and only data in experimental animals suggesting growth promotion (arsenicals are fed to livestock for this reason). Inorganic arsenic has not been found to be essential for human well-being or involved in any required biochemical pathway. Given this and the fact that arsenic occurs naturally in food, consideration of essentiality is not necessary for public health decisions about water. The NRC report concluded: ``For arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action has not been established, but the several modes of action that are considered plausible (namely, indirect mechanisms of mutagenicity) would lead to a sublinear dose-response curve at some point below the point at which a significant increase in tumors is observed. * * * However, because a specific mode (or modes) of action has not yet been identified, it is prudent not to rule out the possibility of a linear response.'' Given the current outstanding questions about human risk at low levels of exposure, decisions about safe levels are public health policy judgments. Risk Characterization In 1983 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983) defined risk assessment as containing four steps: hazard identification, dose- response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk characterization is the process of estimating the health effects based on evaluating the available research, extrapolating to estimate health effects at exposure levels, and characterizing uncertainties. In risk management, regulatory agencies such as EPA evaluate alternatives and select the regulatory action. Risk management considers ``political, social, economic, and engineering information'' using value judgments to consider ``the acceptability of risk and the reasonableness of the costs of control (NAS, 1983).'' Unlike most chemicals, there is a large data base on the effects of arsenic on humans. Inorganic arsenic is a human poison, and oral or inhalation exposure to the chemical can induce many adverse health conditions in humans. Specifically oral exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water has been reported to cause many different human illnesses, including cancer and noncancer effects, as described in Section III. The NRC panel (1999) reviewed the inorganic arsenic health effects data base. The panel members concluded that the studies from Taiwan provided the current best available data for the risk assessment of inorganic arsenic-induced cancer. (There are corroborating studies from Argentina and Chile.) They obtained more detailed Taiwanese internal cancer data and modeled the data using the multistage Weibull model and a Poisson regression model. Three Poisson data analyses showed a 1% response level of male bladder cancer at approximately 400 µg of inorganic arsenic/L. The 1% level was used as a Point of Departure (POD) for extrapolating to exposure levels outside the range of observed data. For an agent that is either acting by reacting directly with DNA or whose mode of action has not been sufficiently characterized, EPA's public health policy is to assume that dose and response will be proportionate as dose decreases (linearity of the extrapolated dose- response curve). This is a science policy approach to provide a public health conservative assessment of risk. The dose-response relationship is extrapolated by taking a straight line from the POD rather than by attempting to extend the model used for the observed range. This approach was adopted by the NRC report which additionally noted that using this approach for arsenic data provides results with alternative models that are consistent at doses below the observed range whereas extending the alternative models below the observed range gives inconsistent results. Drawing a straight line from the POD to zero gives a risk of 1 to 1.5 per 1,000 at the current MCL of 50 µg/ L. Since some studies show that lung cancer deaths may be 2- to 5-fold higher than bladder cancer deaths, the combined cancer risk could be even greater. The NRC panel also noted that the MCL of 50 µg/L is less than 10-fold lower than the 1% response level for male bladder cancer. Based on its review, the consensus opinion of the NRC panel was that the current MCL of 50 µg/L does not meet the EPA's goal of public-health protection. Their report recommended that EPA lower the MCL as soon as possible. A factor that could modify the degree of individual response to inorganic arsenic is its metabolism. There is ample evidence (NRC, 1999) that the quantitative patterns of inorganic arsenic methylation vary co...
... was dedicated the summer of 2008. Planning for the park began in the mid 1990's. Part of the planned park project was on BLM property in which the ci...
...ovide power to St. George. The plant sat idle for a number of years (1981-1995) - but was rebuilt on the same location (7 miles north of the city on a culinary water line) and was rededicated in May 1995. The maximum output is 600 kilowatts (kW) from an induction motor that ...
... Utah State Legislature. My wife Tawny and I have been married since 1996, and we have five children. One of my motivations for running for city ...
... Crosby Family Confluence Park. The original trailhead was constructed in 1997 and in 2010 the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) partnered with...
...ve Washington County Horizontal Control Network (HCN) Elevations use GEOID 99 file in your data collector so that your elevations match those of the p...
As of October 1997, the City of St. George - Utilities is providing a new payment plan cal...
The facility includes a 25m by 25 yd competition and diving pool and a 5,800 s.f. leisure pool. The leisure pool has a zero depth entry area, interactive children's water fun toys, a water walk and wa...