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  DISTRICT REGION(S)  CHAMPION RECORD STATE A 1 Central Arizona 50-9  AZ  B 2, 23 Northeastern Oklahoma A&M 42...
...mits that may be necessary for your event:• Food Handlers permit: 435-986-2580• Large Tent approval: 435-627-4150• Park Reservations: 4...
The St. George Animal Shelter is a city-owned and city-operated animal shelter in St. George, Utah, and we try to find good homes for the animals that are brought into the shelter.  Our employees...
USAPA Event All players must be a member of the USAPA   Fees "Early Bird Fee" All events are $15 each Fee After August 31st:  $20 **Players who have pre registered will have until Au...
Question: What are the hours of the shelter?
Answer: We are open Mon-Fri from 10am to 5:00pm and Saturday 10am-2pm, closed Sunday and Holidays.
...e able to meet the needs of the City of St. George.  It wasn't until 1983 that the first full-time Chief was hired.  By 1992, the area had g...
Question: What area does the City Power Company serve?
Answer: The City Power Company service territory is roughly the area of the City north of the Virgin River.  The area of the City south of the Virgin River was annexed during the 1980’s.  At that time it was served by Dixie Power and continues to be served by that utility today.  
...rological, immunological and reproductive/developmental function (ATSDR, 1998). The most common symptoms of inorganic arsenic exposure appear on the skin and occur after 5-15 years of exposure equivalent to 700 µg/day for a 70 kg adult, or within 6 months to 3 years at exposures equivalent to 2,800 µg/day for a 70 kg adult (pg. 131 NRC, 1999). They include alterations in pigmentation and the development of keratoses which are localized primarily on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet and the torso. The presence of hyper pigmentation and keratoses on parts of the body not exposed to the sun is characteristic of arsenic exposure (Yeh, 1973, Tseng, 1977). The same alterations have been reported in patients treated with Fowler's solution (1% potassium arsenite; Cuzick et al., 1982), used for asthma, psoriasis, rheumatic fever, leukemia, fever, pain, and as a tonic (WHO 1981 and NRC 1999). Although peripheral neuropathy (numbness, muscle weakness, tremors, ATSDR 1998) may be present after exposure to short-term, high doses of inorganic arsenic (Buchanan, 1962; Tay and Seah, 1975), there are no studies that definitely document this effect after exposure to levels of less than levels (50 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water. There have been a few, scattered reports in the literature that inorganic arsenic can affect reproduction and development in humans (Borzysonyi et al., 1992; Desi et al., 1992; Tabacova et al., 1994). After reviewing the available literature on arsenic and reproductive effects, the National Research Council panel (NRC 1999) wrote that ``nothing conclusive can be stated from these studies.'' Based on the studies mentioned in this section, it is evident that inorganic arsenic contamination of drinking water can cause dermal and internal cancers, affect the GI system, alter cardiovascular function, and increase risk of diabetes, based on studies of people exposed to drinking water well above the current arsenic MCL. EPA's MCL is chosen to be protective of the general population within an acceptable risk range, not at levels at which adverse health effects are routinely seen (see section III.F.7. on risk considerations). In terms of implications for the risk assessment, the panel noted that risk per unit dose estimates from human studies can be biased either way. For the Taiwanese study, the ``* * * biases associated with the use of average doses and with the attribution of all increased risk to arsenic would both lead to an overestimation of risk (US EPA, 1997d, page 31). May 1999 Utah Mortality Study EPA scientists conducted an epidemiological study of 4,058 Mormons exposed to arsenic in drinking water in seven communities in Millard County, Utah (Lewis et al., 1999). The 151 samples from their public and private drinking water sources had arsenic concentrations ranging from 4 to 620 µg/L with seven mean (arithmetic average) community exposure concentrations of 18 to 191 µg/L and all seven community exposure medians (mid-point of arsenic values) 200 µg/L. Observed causes of death in the study group (numbering 2,203) were compared to those expected from the same causes based upon death rates for the general white male and female population of Utah. Several factors suggest that the study population may not be representative of the rest of the United States. The Mormon church, the predominant religion in Utah, prohibits smoking and consumption of alcohol and caffeine. Utah had the lowest statewide smoking rates in the U.S. from 1984 to 1996, ranging from 13 to 17%. Mormon men had about half the cancers related to smoking (mouth, larynx, lung, esophagus, and bladder cancers) as the U.S. male population from 1971 to 1985 (Lyon et al., 1994). The Utah study population was relatively small (4,000 persons) and primarily English, Scottish, and Scandinavian in ethnic background. While the study population males had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer mortality, females had no significant excess risk of cancer mortality at any site. Millard County subjects had higher mortality from kidney cancer, but this was not statistically significant. Both males and females in the study group had less risk of bladder, digestive system and lung cancer mortality than the general Utah population. The Mormon females had lower death rates from breast and female genital cancers than the State rate. These decreased death rates were not statistically significant. Although deaths due to hypertensive heart disease were roughly twice as high as expected in both sexes, increases in death did not relate to increases in dose, calculated as the years of exposure times the median arsenic concentration. The Utah data indicate that heart disease should be considered in the evaluation of potential benefits of U.S. regulation. Vascular effects have also been reported as an effect of arsenic exposure in studies in the U.S. (Engel et al. 1994), Taiwan (Wu et al., 1989) and Chile (Borgono et al., 1977). The overall evidence indicating an association of various vascular diseases with arsenic exposure supports consideration of this endpoint in evaluation of potential noncancer health benefits of arsenic exposure reduction. Study of Bladder and Kidney Cancer in Finland Kurttio et al. (1999) conducted a case-cohort design study of 61 bladder and 49 kidney cancer cases and 275 controls to evaluate the risk of these diseases with respect to arsenic drinking water concentrations. In this study the median exposure was 0.1 µg/L, the maximum reported was 64 µg/L, and 1% of the exposure was greater than 10 µg/L. The authors reported that very low concentrations of arsenic in drinking water were significantly associated with being a case of bladder cancer when exposure occurred 2-9 years prior to diagnosis. Arsenic exposure occurring greater than 10 years prior to diagnosis was not associated with bladder cancer risk. Arsenic was not associated with kidney cancer risk even after consideration of a latency period. The NRC report examined the question of essentiality of arsenic in the human diet. It found no information on essentiality in humans and only data in experimental animals suggesting growth promotion (arsenicals are fed to livestock for this reason). Inorganic arsenic has not been found to be essential for human well-being or involved in any required biochemical pathway. Given this and the fact that arsenic occurs naturally in food, consideration of essentiality is not necessary for public health decisions about water. The NRC report concluded: ``For arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action has not been established, but the several modes of action that are considered plausible (namely, indirect mechanisms of mutagenicity) would lead to a sublinear dose-response curve at some point below the point at which a significant increase in tumors is observed. * * * However, because a specific mode (or modes) of action has not yet been identified, it is prudent not to rule out the possibility of a linear response.'' Given the current outstanding questions about human risk at low levels of exposure, decisions about safe levels are public health policy judgments. Risk Characterization In 1983 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983) defined risk assessment as containing four steps: hazard identification, dose- response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk characterization is the process of estimating the health effects based on evaluating the available research, extrapolating to estimate health effects at exposure levels, and characterizing uncertainties. In risk management, regulatory agencies such as EPA evaluate alternatives and select the regulatory action. Risk management considers ``political, social, economic, and engineering information'' using value judgments to consider ``the acceptability of risk and the reasonableness of the costs of control (NAS, 1983).'' Unlike most chemicals, there is a large data base on the effec...
...es physical and biological processes to treat the sewage. There is a 97 to 98% removal rate of contaminates in the treatment process.    T...
...to provide power to St. George. The plant sat idle for a number of years (1981-1995) - but was rebuilt on the same location (7 miles north of the city...
...ign and Construction for the City of St. George was last published in May 1987. This 1987 edition and its associated addendums provided a service to the engineers, contractors, developers and other interested parties. This new edition, July 2000, under the same title is designed to replace the 1987 edition. It is intended to provide standard requirements for installati...
...y 900 524 376 900-524=376 Aug 600 498 102 600-498=102 Sept 400 453 -53 400-453=(53) Oct 420 436 -69 420-436+(53)=(69) Nov 400 318 13 400-318+(69)=13 Dec 300 287 13 300-287=13     In this scenario, Customer A used the kWh credit and was billed for the energy needed from St. George.  The customer will not be paid anything for excess solar generation in December.   For the customer who has a kWh credit in December, see the chart below.     Customer B Month Consumed kWh Generated kWh kWh billed or credit Bill reflects March 420 445 -25 420 - 445 = (25) April 480 495 -40 480 - 495+(25) = (40) May 550 527 -17 550-527+(40) = (17) June 560 552 -9 560-552+(17) = (9) July 570 524 37 570-524+(9)= 37 Aug 525 498 27 525-498=27 Sept 500 453 47 500-453=47 Oct ...
...t or also want to call home.  I graduated from Dixie High School in 1984 and shortly thereafter married my high school sweetheart Tony Randall. ...
ATP Description ATP clinics will utilize the yellow ball and full 78’ court staying within the parameters of the USTA (United States Tennis Association)  There will be 3 levels allowing p...
Description Jr. Development clinics utilize a 75% compressed green dot ball and a 78’ court (full size court) to help players between the ages of 10 and 13 and staying within the parameters of ...
Tournament #1 - Wednesday, May 31, Dixie Red Hills - Register Here Parent/JR Tournament - Thursday, June 1, St. George Golf Club - Register Here Tournament #2 - Wednesday, June 7, St. George Golf Cl...