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...inating and booking their own transportation. St. George, Utah is located 119 miles northeast of Las Vegas. Dependent upon the selected airport for arrival, corresponding ground transportation will be required.  Airports St. George Municipal Airport - SGU4550 S. Airport ParkwaySt. George, UT 84790(435) 634-5822www.flysgu.com OR McCarran International Airport - LAS5757 Wayne Newton BoulevardLas Vegas, NV 89119(702) 261-5211 Ground Transportation St. George Shuttle(435) 628-8320 O...
Visit the St. George Municipal Pool and ride the “Hydro-Abyss”.  The thrill ride features an ever changing fiber-optic color display experience at each turn and drop of the 330 f...
...ty.org. Parks are open from sunrise to 10pm. Refer to Park Ordinance 1982-10-1.   1.    All fees will be collected at the ...
...dures cover all complaints filed under Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color and nation...
...;             $190            &nbs...
...by the Southern Utah Builders Association.   Fire Station 7 – 1912 West 1800 North Fire Station 7 is in the general location of Snow Can...
...th Burial - 1st Opening Double standard fee Disinterment - Adult $1,190 $1,190 Disinterment - Infant/Cremation $595 $595 Double Depth Disinterment Double standard fee Late Notice / Late Arrival Fee $100 $100   Plot Fees     Service Resident Non Resident Full Plot $350 $550 Perpetual Care $200 $300 Upright Monument Rows   $150 additional $250 additional Half Plot $200 $295 Perpetual Care $100 $150 Upright Monument Rows   $150 additional $250 additional Fees for Tonaquint Cemetery Cremation Garden   Service Resident Non Resident Space for a Granite Tablet $280 $365 Space for an Individual Post Marker $305 $400 Space for a Companion Post Marker $610 $795 Space for a Premium Individual Post Marker $350 $455 Space for a Premium Companion Post Masrker $700 $910 Space for a Granite Bench $920 $1,195 Space in a Columbarium $580 $755 Space for a Cremation Pedestal $920 $1,195 Tree Estate (up to 8 spaces) $1,940 $2,525 Cremation Estate...
Special Event Applications can be submitted via email to events@sgcity.org or faxed to 435-627-4430. Please review the Special Event Application and Process Packet for questions regarding your event, ...
... He attended all the local schools and graduated from Dixie High School in 1970 and from Dixie College in 1972. He furthered his education with a degree in Political Science from the University of Utah in 1974. He received his Master’s Degree with a Master of Public Administration (MPA) from Brigham Young University in 1976. Gary was employed by the City of St. George in 1975 as a Management Intern. He then served as the Assistant to the Mayor of Riverton City in 1975 and 1976, and returned to the City of St. George as the Assistant to the City Coordinator in 1976. He became City Manager in 1977, and has served as such to the present day. Gary is active in his...
...and community relations. History The St. George Fire Department began in 1936.  The twenty-three members that made up the Chief, Captains, and crews were all volunteers.  The first fire engine in St. George was a 1936 Studebaker, which the Department still owns and houses at Station #2, which is the first fire station the city built.  The truck is no longer in service unless absolutely necessary, but you may have seen it at special occasions, such as parades.   For nearly fifty years, the dedicated volunteer firefighters were able to meet the needs of the City of St. George.  It wasn't until 1983 that the first full-time Chief was hired.  By 1992, the area had grown large enough to require a full-time staff of firef...
...uilding which is now the St. George Art Museum was originally built in the 1930's to store beet seed for a sugar beet factory. The Utah-Idaho Sugar Company, after determining that sugar beet seed was a good "cash" crop, built the building in 1934, using it along with the already existing opera house and another building which is now the Social Hall. This was the start of a business that would last for nearly fifty years.  Sugar beets were planted in the Washington Fields and Bloomington in the fall. Due to the mild-winter climate in Utah's Dixie, the crop could stay in the ground over winter. In the spring, the plants would be harvested and hauled by horse-drawn wagons to the factory where they would undergo a process to remove the seed which was sorted, cleaned, treated for disease and stored in bins.  Warehouse No. 3, now the St. George Art Museum, was where the seed was stored and later shipped by hauling the bags of seed to Cedar City where it was sent by train to sugar beet plants in West Jordan, Utah; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Montana, and Washington. After 1955 the seed was all shipped with trucking firms until the sugar company closed in 1979.  The building was vacant after 1979 and became home to mice and pigeons and an eyesore to the community. Through the vision, generosity, and hard work of the community and city officials, the ultimate dream to restore the building as part of the St. George's historic district was realized in 1997 when it became the beautiful new home of the Art Museum. The St. Geor...
...sp;Jon has worked in several positions with Intermountain Healthcare since 1990 – and since 1995 here in St. George. One of the highlights of Jon’s career has b...
...t of the Mississippi River. Undergoing significant renovations in the late 1930s and mid1970s, the structure is the longest continuously operated Mormon Temple in the world.   In 1911, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of St. George’s settling, the Dixie Academy building was constructed. The LDS Church operated the academy until 1933, when it became a two-year college within Utah’s higher education system. The new Dixie College campus opened in the southeastern corner of the city in the 1960s. Today, Dixie State University boasts an enrollment of approximately ...
...America. Council Member Ed Baca's current term expires December 31, 2019.
...MCL results in an increased incidence of cancer or noncancer effects (NRC, 1999, pg. 7)." There have only been a few studies of inorganic arsenic exposure via drinking water in the U.S., and most have not considered cancer as an endpoint. People have written EPA asking that the new MCL be set considering that these U.S. studies have not seen increases in cancers at the low levels of arsenic exposure in U.S. drinking water. A large number of adverse noncarcinogenic effects have been reported in humans after exposure to drinking water highly contaminated with inorganic arsenic. The earliest and most prominent changes are in the skin, e.g., hyper pigmentation and keratoses (callus-like growths). Other effects that have been reported include alterations in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, hematological (e.g., anemia), pulmonary, neurological, immunological and reproductive/developmental function (ATSDR, 1998). The most common symptoms of inorganic arsenic exposure appear on the skin and occur after 5-15 years of exposure equivalent to 700 µg/day for a 70 kg adult, or within 6 months to 3 years at exposures equivalent to 2,800 µg/day for a 70 kg adult (pg. 131 NRC, 1999). They include alterations in pigmentation and the development of keratoses which are localized primarily on the palms of the hands, the soles of the feet and the torso. The presence of hyper pigmentation and keratoses on parts of the body not exposed to the sun is characteristic of arsenic exposure (Yeh, 1973, Tseng, 1977). The same alterations have been reported in patients treated with Fowler's solution (1% potassium arsenite; Cuzick et al., 1982), used for asthma, psoriasis, rheumatic fever, leukemia, fever, pain, and as a tonic (WHO 1981 and NRC 1999). Although peripheral neuropathy (numbness, muscle weakness, tremors, ATSDR 1998) may be present after exposure to short-term, high doses of inorganic arsenic (Buchanan, 1962; Tay and Seah, 1975), there are no studies that definitely document this effect after exposure to levels of less than levels (50 µg/L) of inorganic arsenic in drinking water. There have been a few, scattered reports in the literature that inorganic arsenic can affect reproduction and development in humans (Borzysonyi et al., 1992; Desi et al., 1992; Tabacova et al., 1994). After reviewing the available literature on arsenic and reproductive effects, the National Research Council panel (NRC 1999) wrote that ``nothing conclusive can be stated from these studies.'' Based on the studies mentioned in this section, it is evident that inorganic arsenic contamination of drinking water can cause dermal and internal cancers, affect the GI system, alter cardiovascular function, and increase risk of diabetes, based on studies of people exposed to drinking water well above the current arsenic MCL. EPA's MCL is chosen to be protective of the general population within an acceptable risk range, not at levels at which adverse health effects are routinely seen (see section III.F.7. on risk considerations). In terms of implications for the risk assessment, the panel noted that risk per unit dose estimates from human studies can be biased either way. For the Taiwanese study, the ``* * * biases associated with the use of average doses and with the attribution of all increased risk to arsenic would both lead to an overestimation of risk (US EPA, 1997d, page 31). May 1999 Utah Mortality Study EPA scientists conducted an epidemiological study of 4,058 Mormons exposed to arsenic in drinking water in seven communities in Millard County, Utah (Lewis et al., 1999). The 151 samples from their public and private drinking water sources had arsenic concentrations ranging from 4 to 620 µg/L with seven mean (arithmetic average) community exposure concentrations of 18 to 191 µg/L and all seven community exposure medians (mid-point of arsenic values) 200 µg/L. Observed causes of death in the study group (numbering 2,203) were compared to those expected from the same causes based upon death rates for the general white male and female population of Utah. Several factors suggest that the study population may not be representative of the rest of the United States. The Mormon church, the predominant religion in Utah, prohibits smoking and consumption of alcohol and caffeine. Utah had the lowest statewide smoking rates in the U.S. from 1984 to 1996, ranging from 13 to 17%. Mormon men had about half the cancers related to smoking (mouth, larynx, lung, esophagus, and bladder cancers) as the U.S. male population from 1971 to 1985 (Lyon et al., 1994). The Utah study population was relatively small (4,000 persons) and primarily English, Scottish, and Scandinavian in ethnic background. While the study population males had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer mortality, females had no significant excess risk of cancer mortality at any site. Millard County subjects had higher mortality from kidney cancer, but this was not statistically significant. Both males and females in the study group had less risk of bladder, digestive system and lung cancer mortality than the general Utah population. The Mormon females had lower death rates from breast and female genital cancers than the State rate. These decreased death rates were not statistically significant. Although deaths due to hypertensive heart disease were roughly twice as high as expected in both sexes, increases in death did not relate to increases in dose, calculated as the years of exposure times the median arsenic concentration. The Utah data indicate that heart disease should be considered in the evaluation of potential benefits of U.S. regulation. Vascular effects have also been reported as an effect of arsenic exposure in studies in the U.S. (Engel et al. 1994), Taiwan (Wu et al., 1989) and Chile (Borgono et al., 1977). The overall evidence indicating an association of various vascular diseases with arsenic exposure supports consideration of this endpoint in evaluation of potential noncancer health benefits of arsenic exposure reduction. Study of Bladder and Kidney Cancer in Finland Kurttio et al. (1999) conducted a case-cohort design study of 61 bladder and 49 kidney cancer cases and 275 controls to evaluate the risk of these diseases with respect to arsenic drinking water concentrations. In this study the median exposure was 0.1 µg/L, the maximum reported was 64 µg/L, and 1% of the exposure was greater than 10 µg/L. The authors reported that very low concentrations of arsenic in drinking water were significantly associated with being a case of bladder cancer when exposure occurred 2-9 years prior to diagnosis. Arsenic exposure occurring greater than 10 years prior to diagnosis was not associated with bladder cancer risk. Arsenic was not associated with kidney cancer risk even after consideration of a latency period. The NRC report examined the question of essentiality of arsenic in the human diet. It found no information on essentiality in humans and only data in experimental animals suggesting growth promotion (arsenicals are fed to livestock for this reason). Inorganic arsenic has not been found to be essential for human well-being or involved in any required biochemical pathway. Given this and the fact that arsenic occurs naturally in food, consideration of essentiality is not necessary for public health decisions about water. The NRC report concluded: ``For arsenic carcinogenicity, the mode of action has not been established, but the several modes of action that are considered plausible (namely, indirect mechanisms of mutagenicity) would lead to a sublinear dose-response curve at some point below the point at which a significant increase in tumors is observed. * * * However, because a specific mode (or modes) of action has not yet been identified, it is prudent not to rule out the possibility of a linear response.'' Given the current outstanding questions about human risk at low levels of exposure, decisions about safe levels are public health policy judgments. Risk Characterization In 1983 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 1983) defined risk assessment as containing four steps: hazard identification, dose- response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Risk characterization is the process of estimating the health effects based on evaluating the available research, extrapolating to estimate health effects at exposure levels, and characterizing uncertainties. In risk management, regulatory agencies such as EPA evaluate alternatives and select the regulatory action. Risk management considers ``political, social, economic, and engineering information'' using value judgments to consider ``the acceptability of risk and the reasonableness of the costs of control (NAS, 1983).'' Unlike most chemicals, there is a large data base on the effects of arsenic on humans. Inorganic arsenic is a human poison, and oral or inhalation exposure to the chemical can induce many adverse health conditions in humans. Specifically oral exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water has been reported to cause many different human illnesses, including cancer and noncancer effects, as described in Section III. The NRC panel (1999) reviewed the inorganic arsenic health effects data base. The panel members concluded that the studies from Taiwan provided the current best available data for the risk assessment of inorganic arsenic-induced cancer. (There are corroborating studies from Argentina and Chile.) They obtained more detailed Taiwanese internal cancer data and modeled the data using the multistage Weibull model and a Poisson regression model. Three Poisson data analyses showed a 1% response level of male bladder cancer at approximately 400 µg of inorganic arsenic/L. The 1% level was used as a Point of Departure (POD) for extrapolating to exposure levels outside the range of observed data. For an agent that is either acting by reacting directly with DNA or whose mode of action has not been sufficiently characterized, EPA's public health policy is to assume that dose and response will be proportionate as dose decreases (linearity of the extrapolated dose- response curve). This is a science policy approach to provide a public health conservative assessment of risk. The dose-response relationship is extrapolated by taking a straight line from the POD rather than by attempting to extend the model used for the observed range. This approach was adopted by the NRC report which additionally noted that using this approach for arsenic data provides results with alternative models that are consistent at doses below the observed range whereas extending the alternative models below the observed range gives inconsistent results. Drawing a straight line from the POD to zero gives a risk of 1 to 1.5 per 1,000 at the current MCL of 50 µg/ L. Since some studies show that lung cancer deaths may be 2- to 5-fold higher than bladder cancer deaths, the combined cancer risk could be even greater. The NRC panel also noted that the MCL of 50 µg/L is less than 10-fold lower than the 1% response level for male bladder cancer. Based on its review, the consensus opinion of the NRC panel was that the current MCL of 50 µg/L does not meet the EPA's goal of public-health protection. Their report recommended that EPA lower the MCL as soon as possible. A factor that could modify the degree of individual response to inorganic arsenic is its metabolism. There is ample evidence (NRC, 1999) that the quantitative patterns of inorganic arsenic methylation vary ...
Question: Where are you located?  
Answer: 1975 S. Tonaquint Drive     
Question: What area does the City Power Company serve?
Answer: The City Power Company service territory is roughly the area of the City north of the Virgin River.  The area of the City south of the Virgin River was annexed during the 1980’s.  At that time it was served by Dixie Power and continues to be served by that utility today.  
...sp;Bicycle Patrol The bicycle patrol unit was formed in the summer of 1997 with the purpose in mind of addressing all "quality of life" issues th...
...economic climate Will accommodate regional jet aircraft, 737s and Airbus 319s Access provided from the new Interchange two and Southern Parkway whic...
...ing. Prices are as follows: $12 for children (6-18yrs) and $15 for adults (19 & up). Kids 5 and under are free. Tickets can also be purchased at t...
Question: How do I get on the City's bidders list?
Answer: You can register by completing the Bidders List Application. This can be obtained by going to www.sgcity.org or by calling the Purchasing Department at (435)627-4717 or 435-627-4719. You can also stop by the Purchasing office, located at 175 E 200 N, St. George, UT, 84770. In the near future you be able to register on line.  
Question: Where are you located? 
Answer: Our address is 2190 South 1400 East.
...k was dedicated the summer of 2008. Planning for the park began in the mid 1990's. Part of the planned park project was on BLM property in which the c...
...e City of St. George Wastewater Collection system was first started around 1932. The division currently inspects, cleans, and maintains over 415 miles...
The Pine Valley Hydro Plant was originally constructed in 1941 and continues to provide power to St. George. The plant sat idle for a number of years (1981-1995) - but was rebuilt on the same location (7 miles north of the city on a culinary water line) and was rededicated in May 1995. The maximum output is 600 kilowatts (kW) from an induction motor that...
...sign and Construction for the City of St. George was last published in May 1987. This 1987 edition and its associated addendums provided a service to the engineers, contractors, developers and other interested parties. This new edition, July 2000, under the same title is designed to replace the 1987 edition. It is intended to provide standard requirements for installat...
...Family: $145.00    One year membership Individual: $195.00 Family:  $350.00   Tri-Pack one year Membership Indivi...
...se was the first golf course developed by the City of St.George in the mid 1960’s taking us from a desert gas station stop to a true place of be...
...dchildren. Council Member Arial's current term expires December 31, 2019.
I was born right here in St. George in 1970. I grew up on the corner of 500 South and 500 East. I attended East Elementary, Dixie Jr. and High School as well as a short stay at Dixie College. Shortly after serving 2 years in Brazil as a LDS Missionary, I went to work for a highly rated financial institution in California. I was trained and worked as a real estate appraiser and eventually was trained in the wholesale mortgage business. I worked there for over 12 years in California, Salt Lake City and finally back to St. George. Once back in St. George I decided to follow the American spirit of independence and become self employed. I have been a partner in several business ventures. I am currently an independent mortgage broker, appraiser, and partner in a company that provides capital to small business and last but not least, a cattle rancher. I like to say, "When I grow up I just want to be a rancher!" Owning a ranch is a good excuse to get out of the office and be in the outdoors. It is on the ranch that I learned the value of hard work that I will put to use on the city council. I currently serve as the Secretary/Treasurer of the Washington County Farm Bureau. This organization has boards in counties throughout the state. Delegates from these boards meet annually to vote on legislative policy that we support. These policy recommendations are then presented and lobbied for in the Utah State Legislature. My wife Tawny and I have been married since 1996, and we have five children. One of my motivations for running for city council is to help ensure a safe and happy environment for my kids to grow up in. I want them to have the opportunity to stay here once they are grown. Truly my priorities are God, Family and Country. Councilman Jimmie Hughes's current term expires December 31, 2019.
...n went off and put a bullet hole in the ceiling.   During the early 1900's to the mid-1920's, the Social Hall was called the "Opera House" because of the many operettas and vaudeville shows that were presented during host years. Most notable of these were Pinafore and Robin Hood.   The Social Hall/ Opera House functioned for 50 years as the center of Southern Utah's cultural activities. A generation of pioneers cast their heavy loads aside and laughed, cried smiled and cheered.   In the 1930's the Social Hall/Opera House was sold and used as a sugar beet seed c...
In 1978 my family moved from Arizona to St George. At that time, the population of St George was about 10,000. There were 2 elementary schools, one middle school and one high school.  Times have certainly changed. We have experienced tremendous growth through the years yet we have been able to maintain the beautiful city many want to visit or also want to call home.  I graduated from Dixie High School in 1984 and shortly thereafter married my high school sweetheart Tony Randall....
...e Crosby Family Confluence Park. The original trailhead was constructed in 1997 and in 2010 the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) partnered wit...
...sp;            ASH701945E_M    SNOW   Direct IP (DIP): Internet Broadca...
Description Jr. Development clinics utilize a 75% compressed green dot ball and a 78’ court (full size court) to help players between the ages of 10 and 13 and staying within the parameters of ...
Description: Orange ball clinic will be played on a 60’ court and 50% compression orange balls to help players improve their tennis game.  Tennis rackets and court size are scaled dow...
...l Skill  Matches will begin around 1pm on Friday Saturday, November 19th Mixed Doubles All Ages / All Skill  Match times will be ann...
Description:     Munchkins will be playing in the service boxes using the Red Low Compressed balls and Junior Size Rackets. Players will learn the Forehand and Backhand Groundstrok...